Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

04/29/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

It was Albert Camus’ insight that bad things often result from ignorance, and that “good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding.”

04/28/2014 | Opinion

Editor's Note: Breaking the Silence, an organization of IDF veterans that publicly discusses their experiences serving in what they call the "Occupied Territories" obtained this letter from a Hillel member. In it, Hillel Internationl's CEO, Eric Fingerhut, discusses how his organization reacted to a presentation at Washington University's Hillel by a member of Breaking the Silence, Oded Na'aman. Please find an opinion piece by Na'aman here

Friends:

This week I have received emails regarding the program involving J Street U, Breaking the Silence, and Hillel at Washington University. Many expressed anger and opposition to Hillel’s decision to host the program. 

04/28/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

I was born in Israel. I served in the Army. Israel is the only home I know. You would think my speaking to students at Hillel would be welcomed. Yet my presentation to students at Washington University’s Hillel in St. Louis last month sparked a storm of controversy.

04/25/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

"Thou shalt not be a victim. Thou shalt not be an oppressor. But thou shalt never be a bystander," distinguished Holocaust scholar and author Yehuda Bauer stated to the German Bundestag in 1998. He even suggested it was time to add these three mandates to the Ten Commandments.  Yet, since that speech a decade-and-a-half ago, human beings continue to watch as others are being oppressed and killed.

04/24/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

It was Albert Camus’ insight that bad things often result from ignorance, and that “good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding.”

04/23/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Two opposing trends can be discerned within today’s American Jewish community. The first is the move to precisely define the borders and boundaries between various Jewish denominations and religious groups. On the pages of this newspaper and elsewhere, there are debates about what precisely constitutes Open, Modern, or Ultra Orthodoxy, and where exactly the boundary is between Orthodox and Conservative Judaism. On social media, this splintering and boundary-setting is even more pronounced as quasi-denominational labels like Egalitarian Traditional, Left-Wing Conservative and Modern Ultra-Orthodox proliferate.