Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

08/12/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

The American media’s laser-focus on Gaza was finally broken last week by two factors: the end of Israel’s Operation Protective Edge and the beginning of a new military campaign, this one by the United States against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

08/12/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

The debate, already ongoing as the Palestinian civilian death count rose in Gaza, was amped up by Leon Wieseltier — to many, the Jewish community’s “public intellectual” — in his Aug. 6 New Republic article, “Israel and Gaza: A Just and Unjust War.” Wieseltier, in his declaration of surprise “by the magnitude of the indifference in the Jewish world to the human costs of Israel’s defense against the missiles and the tunnels,” raised questions among some analysts about “armchair moralism.” How, for instance, does Wieseltier measure “magnitude?”

08/12/2014 | | Opinion

I am an Israeli citizen. I am an American citizen. I am also completing a Master's degree in Holocaust studies and a resident of Gush Etzion, a bloc of settlements in the West Bank in Israel. Now that I've laid all my cards out on the table, I am going to rail against a phenomenon that has developed over the past few years: comparing Israelis to Nazis. The comparison is insulting and blatantly, historically inaccurate. 

08/12/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

When missiles and bombs are flying, while terrorists kidnap and murder, when civilians are caught in the crossfire, and when diaspora Jews and Palestinians are vilified and attacked, there is no good news for anyone. But planning beyond the horrors of the past weeks, as we must, careful scanning of changes in the Arab and Muslim worlds suggest new opportunities for Israelis to live at peace with Palestinians and other neighbors.

08/11/2014 | | Opinion

When missiles and bombs are flying, while terrorists kidnap and murder, when civilians are caught in the crossfire, and when diaspora Jews and Palestinians are vilified and attacked, there is no good news for anyone. But planning beyond the horrors of the past weeks, as we must, careful scanning of changes in the Arab and Muslim worlds suggest new opportunities for Israelis to live at peace with Palestinians and other neighbors.

08/11/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

As I sat in an office in Washington, D.C. a couple of weeks ago refreshing live updates of the most recent escalation in Gaza, I felt a wave of déjà vu. The last time I had read similar updates this obsessively, they had been more intensely relevant to my own life. When I decided to volunteer in Tel Aviv in 2012 before beginning college I had not expected a war, although I knew it was an ever-present possibility in Israel. And yet there I was: jumping at sirens, running for shelter with my roommates, and waiting for the boom and smoke in the sky which signaled the Iron Dome’s success in meeting a missile mid-air. The Tel Aviv bubble had been broken, and a city I had come to know and love was tinged with fear. Dusty bomb shelters were reopened and people ran for those shelters, or whatever covering they could find, when the air raid sirens wailed. I vividly remember attempting to walk my usual route to work in a defiant attempt at normalcy – it failed, because I spent the entire time scanning every block for potential shelter in case of a siren.