Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

09/02/2014 | | Special to The Jewish Week | Opinion

With the new school year upon us, Jewish educational leaders are scrambling to prepare their teachers to discuss this summer’s Gaza War. The most pressing challenge is to design age-appropriate conversations: At which grade level might classroom discussions include potentially frightening topics, such as the wounding of non-combatants, kidnapping of young Israelis and sirens warning of incoming rockets? And how should teachers address the tough issues of civilian casualties in Gaza and the flagrant hostility toward Jews and Israel that has erupted in many parts of the world?

09/02/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

There has been so much analysis written about this summer’s war in Gaza — why it got started, how it was prosecuted, under which conditions it could and should be brought to a conclusion, and who were the winners and losers. So much complexity, so many moving parts, and what is there left to say?  

08/29/2014 | | Opinion

Rumors of the demise of liberal Zionism are rampant, fanned most recently by Antony Lerman in last weekend’s New York Times (“The End of Liberal Zionism”).

08/26/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

In late June, when the three innocent Israeli teenagers kidnapped by Hamas had not yet been found murdered and the Jewish world still only feared the worst, the Presbyterian Church’s General Assembly voted to “selectively divest” from three companies it claimed “furthered the Israeli occupation in Palestine.” In doing so, the denomination’s governing body cast its lot with the global boycott, divestment and sanctions movement that seeks to delegitimize the State of Israel and blame it for the conflict. The decision, while stunning in its bias, was really not all that surprising.

08/26/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Even if you’re a very casual observer of the U.S. Jewish community and a friend who knows nothing about it asks you, “How big a phenomenon is Jewish intermarriage?” you’d probably be able to answer, “It’s pretty big.”

08/19/2014 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

‘You must be so relieved that everyone is safe,” greeted a colleague as I returned to JFK with 26 American students after their summer fellowship in Israel. As co-director of the Bronfman Youth Fellowships, a Jewish leadership program for young Israelis and Americans, this summer has been anything but a relief for me. I spent the first three weeks of the conflict in my home in New York, my stomach in knots about every aspect of our group’s itinerary, reassuring parents of our efforts to keep their American children safe. And then I arrived in Israel where I encountered the emotional disruption of this war as experienced by young Israelis. Spending time in Israel brought into focus the vast difference between how Israeli and American Jews are dealing with this conflict.