Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

10/17/2011 | | Opinion

My Promise To An Elderly Progressive Activist

10/11/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

There is an old joke told of a Rabbi leaving synagogue after Kol Nidre services. On his way home he was astonished to see Goldstein, one of his congregants, sitting in a non-kosher restaurant eating a sumptuous meal.

As Goldstein exited the restaurant, the rabbi accosted him: “What are you doing, I just saw you eating treif, and paying for it on Yom Kippur. Explain yourself!” Goldstein replied: “Oy, I am sorry rabbi, but I just forgot.”

“Did you forget that today was Yom Kippur?” “No.”

10/11/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

During a visit to South Africa last summer, I stopped at the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg, hoping to better understand how so despicable a system could dominate that country for nearly half a century, from 1948-1991, and why any comparisons to Israel are ridiculous. I came away humbled, wondering whether there might just be a little residue of apartheid in us all.

10/06/2011 | | Opinion

Strolling through the Orthodox neighborhoods of Williamsburg on the last day of Sukkot, I passed row upon row of three-sided huts built against storefronts, brownstone doors, balconies, and sidewalks.

10/06/2011 | | Opinion

News of the death of Apple’s founder and CEO, Steve Jobs, spread across the Internet just as quickly as reviews of the brand new iPhone 4S. The man, who President Barack Obama called “among the greatest of American innovators - brave enough to think differently, bold enough to believe he could change the world, and talented enough to do it,” was loved by the world. I found myself saddened upon learning of his passing. It’s not just because of my addiction to my MacBook, iPhone and iPad – some of the revolutionary technology he designed in recent years.

10/05/2011 | | Opinion

I was fortunate to be invited as one of 50 participants in a two-day retreat last month called “The Conversation.” Sponsored by The Jewish Week, the program is an annual opportunity for a diverse group of Jews from across the country to come together to dialogue about Jewish issues in a comfortable and casual environment.  There is no agenda other than to stimulate communication and create bonds between segments of the Jewish community that are not always in contact or in concert.