Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

10/04/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

I recently took a walk in the woods with two women, one 20 years older than I am, the other 40 years older, to discuss the challenges of aging. We paused when we saw white-tailed deer hop-freeze beside us in the thicket. We shared stories about women in our lives, and how they navigated the aging process. We talked about our own changing bodies, changing minds, changing children, changing communities. We turned our faces towards the sunshine and stopped in our tracks when someone shared a particularly resonant insight, as we let it wash over us.

09/27/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

God: (Genesis 22:2, as read on Rosh HaShanah) “Take your child, your only child, that you love so dearly, and offer him to Me as a sacrifice.”

09/27/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

The holidays are late this year.” We hear that expression often, especially when Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur fall after mid-September. But what does that expression mean? What can it tell us about who we are as American Jews, and how can it help us find what we need from our tradition?
For starters, how can Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur be “late?” They always come on the same two dates — the 1st and the 10th of Tishrei. Of course, that is according to only one of the calendars on which most of us rely.

09/20/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

The story of the akedah (the sacrifice, referring to Abraham and Isaac) reminds me of a Yiddish aphorism to the effect that “an act of folly which turns out well is still an act of folly.”

09/20/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Israel can claim to be a full democracy only so long as it treats its Arab minority fairly. While the economic gap between Israeli Arabs and Jews remains large, the ruling coalition has undertaken real efforts to reduce discriminatory practices in policing, government employment, national service, and education. At the same time, Israeli Jews appear to be increasingly hostile to providing full political and civil rights to Israel’s Arab citizens.

09/20/2011 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

As a strong supporter of Israel, I believe that the desire of Fatah leaders to have the United Nations Security Council recognize Palestine is a positive move that can lead to peace. Any move that establishes a Palestinian state more or less along the 1967 lines is a guarantee for the future of the idea of two lands for two peoples: the Jews and the Palestinians. Indeed, as Hamas well understands, the absence of such a resolution would be anathema for the Jews and Israel.