view counter

Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

04/03/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Even upon landing in Paris, en route to Toulouse, it was clear that a grave thing has happened. I could see an armed soldier every few meters. When I got off the El Al plane from Israel a heavy feeling connected me immediately to the reality not only of what happened — the murder of a teacher and three children at the Ozar Hatorah School by a terrorist — but also to our being vulnerable.

04/03/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

I recently participated on a panel about reframing the “Jewish narrative” at the inaugural Bay Area Limmud. The panel was premised on the notion that the dominant Jewish narrative in the last century was one of survival. The panelists were asked to suggest a new Jewish narrative, one that focused more on the value that Judaism can add to people’s lives, and less on Jewish endurance in the face of hostility.

04/03/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

During Bill Clinton’s successful campaign for the presidency, he famously donned a black kipa during a visit to the Western Wall in Jerusalem and shed a tear in a prayerful (and highly photogenic) moment. And in that moment, the organized Jewish community — then awkwardly watching the tensions between Prime Minister Shamir and President Bush — fawned over the philo-Semitism and lined up for Clinton’s subsequent election.

03/29/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week Online | Opinion

A lot of folks my age have misperceptions about TribeFest, if they have even heard of it.  For the uninitiated, TribeFest is Jewish Federations of North America’s conference for 20- and 30-somethings, designed to engage, educate, and inspire them to become active in the Federation system and in organized Jewish life.  TribeFest 2012 was the second such conference, both held in Las Vegas.

03/27/2012 | | Special To the Jewish Week | Opinion

When our Brooklyn synagogue recently hosted two former State Department veterans, Elliot Abrams and Robert Malley, a few congregants and even a local merchant objected to our having invited Mr. Abrams, a known “war criminal.”  

Similarly, when our synagogue hosted Columbia professor Rashid Khalidi, a Palestinian academic, others claimed our pulpit now had “Jewish blood on its hands.”  Another congregant asked, “How can you invite Malley?  He and the president hate Jews.”

03/27/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Gary Rosenblatt thinks I’m a good guy but found my book, “The Crisis of Zionism,” frustrating. How appropriate, because I think he’s a good guy too, but thought his review did The Jewish Week’s readers a disservice.

Reviewers are supposed to analyze a book’s argument. Gary barely tries. He writes that “Beinart weakens his moral case by ignoring Israel’s security concerns.” Gary’s evidence for this assertion? He doesn’t offer any.