Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

09/11/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

‘We don’t know where we’re headed,” an Israeli librarian said to me during a visit my husband and I made to Israel last month. She was speaking, of course, about Iran, which fills the newspapers there as it does here. We were in the country during the peak of speculation about when Israel would bomb Iran’s nuclear facilities, with headlines blaring that Benjamin Netanyahu had decided to attack within the next four months, or two months, or maybe one month.

09/11/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Imagine more than a quarter-million American Jews — Democrats and Republicans, observant and secular, and individuals representing the entire spectrum of Israeli politics — gathering at one time, in one place, with a single unified message on behalf of fellow Jews, in the name of the universal principle of freedom.

If you are older than 40, and were connected in any way to the Jewish community in 1987, chances are you don’t have to imagine.  You can remember.

09/11/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

Who doesn’t need a second chance? Each of us has something we wish we could do over, start fresh or finish differently. Don’t you? Well, Rosh HaShanah is your opportunity. At its core, Rosh HaShanah promises us that we can transcend the past and get that second chance that each of us needs in at least some part of our lives.  

09/07/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

 

On Tuesday morning, vandals defaced the Monastery of the Silent Monks at Latrun with anti-Christian graffiti. They also attempted, unsuccessfully, to burn the door. Rabbi Mauricio Balter of the Masorti (Conservative) Kehillat Eshel Avraham in Beersheva and president of the Rabbinical Assembly of Israel, was part of a Masorti delegation that visited the monks at Latrun in the aftermath of the incident. A translation of his remarks is reproduced below. (Translation by Arie Hasit, spiritual advisor to Masorti’s NOAM youth movement.)

09/05/2012 | | Opinion

A few months ago my friend Phyllis H. Waldmann called to say that when going through the papers of her deceased mother, she came across an envelope postmarked October 20, 1936.  Upon carefully opening it, she found a document written in German with the word Halitzah at the top. Although not knowing what the document was, she detected certain similarities to her parents’ ketubah, which she had restored in 1985 on the occasion of their fiftieth wedding anniversary.

09/05/2012 | | Opinion

I was taken aback by Rabbi Hershel Schachter's article, "Experimental Judaism: Playing with Fire". It paints a picture of Christianity that was accurate before 1965, but which has undergone a sea change--one might even say a theological earthquake. This occurred as a result of the miraculous establishment of the State of Israel and the realization by honest and authoritative Church leaders that the Holocaust could not have taken place had it not been for the seeds of anti Semitism sown by Christian teachings over the last two millennia.