Editorial & Opinion | Opinion

05/22/2012 | | Opinion

When it comes to addressing the Israeli/Palestinian relationship, it is time for the American Jewish community to take Hillel’s injunction, a pragmatic progenitor of The Golden Rule, more seriously. By challenging ourselves to examine our words and actions from the perspective of “the Other” we might be better equipped to act with the compassion God demands of us.

05/20/2012 | | Opinion

This is why the Internet asifa (the large-scale rally, planned by haredim against the Internet, which took place on Sunday night at Citi Field) is important for K’lal Yisroel: because a wholesome lie is better than any broken truth; because denial must be protected at all costs; because ignorance is sacred in a world whose existence depends on it.

05/15/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

An unfortunate local controversy involving the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago and the former leadership of the Newberger Hillel at the University of Chicago has attracted widespread attention. Some of the commentary has cast the issue as setting a stodgy, anachronistic establishment up against creative, exciting innovation (“Are We Overly Invested In Bricks And Mortar?” Editor’s column, May 4).

05/15/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

In January, I read an article that has been bothering me until now. 

In his Jan. 3 column, “Why Funders Need to Embrace Failure,” Gary Rosenblatt, editor and publisher of The Jewish Week, described a project called The Israel Experience, which was launched in 1992 to bring tens of thousands of Jewish teens to Israel for eight-week summer programs, as “an acknowledged failure.”

05/15/2012 | | Special To The Jewish Week | Opinion

An annual ritual begins snow and runs through mid-June: approximately 100,000 Jewish students will be donning mortar boards and gowns and accepting diplomas on more than 500 colleges and universities across our continent.

05/14/2012 | | Special to the Jewish Week | Opinion

 

The Conservative Movement is in crisis.

The United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism estimates that from 1985 to 2009, 175 affiliated congregations have dispersed or merged with other denominations. The movement’s branch of day schools, the Solomon Schechter schools, has had the sharpest enrollment decline out of any denominational schools with a 3.8 percent decrease from 2010 to 2011, and since 1998, 20 Conservative day schools have shut down nationwide.