Editorial & Opinion | Letters

05/21/2014 | | Letters

As a child of Holocaust survivors whose parents spent much time imparting their experiences to rapt audiences of all ages, religions, and races, I found your article, “Millennials Altering Landscape of Holocaust Remembrance,” (April 25) profoundly disturbing.

05/14/2014 | | Letters

Regarding Jonathan Mark’s article, “A Hero Of Biblical Proportions,” April 18: Well done. A fitting tribute to Yaakov Birnbaum, who inspired me and many other 1964 Yeshiva College seniors to protest regularly on behalf of Soviet Jewry. Mark was on point to credit Glenn Richter’s immense contribution to the movement.

05/14/2014 | | Letters

 Gary Rosenblatt’s column, “Did J Street Win The War By Losing The Battle? (May 9), concludes that “the least we can do from these shores is to continue to wrestle with each other.” That conclusion is inadequate.

05/14/2014 | | Letters

Your Editorial says that following the Fatah/Hamas reconciliation deal and the collapse of negotiations, “one concern now is that Israelis will feel life can go on as usual, without a heavy price to pay” (‘Israeli-Palestinian Talks: End Of The Road?’ April 30). I would have thought that would be a cause for relief, not concern.

05/14/2014 | | Letters

Rabbi Avi Shafran’s complaint (“Social Injustice And The Ramapo School Board,” Opinion, May 2) about the state aid formula used for East Ramapo is unquestionably and maybe eternally valid, but it has little to do with the disaster that the East Ramapo School District has become, a fact that in itself is undoubtedly fostering anti-Semitism in the Hudson Valley and beyond.

05/14/2014 | | Letters

Regarding your Editorial, “Israel’s Paradigm Shift On The Diaspora”
(Feb. 21), one obvious way to involve the diaspora leaps to mind. Israel
could establish an online registry of Jews abroad who could then vote online, in non-binding referendums, on subjects about which the Knesset or the prime
minister thought the world Jewish community should be consulted. Such a
possibility of voting together, as a people, on issues of major importance, 
would involve the diaspora community in Israeli and Jewish affairs in an
intimate way, a way in which they have never before been involved. It would
also speak volumes to the world that Israel is, indeed, a state of the Jewish
people. 
Questions such as whether conversion should be supervised only by the Chief
Rabbinate, or whether women should be allowed to pray at the Kotel and under
what circumstances, or, even, whether Israel should accept a proposed peace
proposal, could be posed online, and Jews around the world could vote online.