Judaism, After All, Is A Religion
Wed, 11/13/2013
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There are many statements in Marion Usher’s opinion piece on the Pew survey that I agree with 
(“Religion Is Only One Way To Identify As A Jew,” Nov. 1). Her conclusions, though, appear to me to be totally at odds with the
facts, even as she presents them. Blaming “nuance” for the fact that
reality doesn’t meet her fantasy is nothing more than denial.

Yes, remembering the Holocaust and leading a moral and ethical life are
central to Jewish identification. Yes, members of the Workmen’s Circle
movement often didn’t belong to a synagogue but still identified as Jews. Yes, young people are expressing their Jewish identity with social justice
activism. Yes, Jewish film festivals are a part of the growing movement to
engage Jews, etc. But how many grandchildren of Workman’s
Circle members are practicing Jews today, by any definition? The same for
virtually all Jews who were only culturally
attached. Over the last few centuries, Jews have attached themselves to
“isms” of all types, but in the process have for the most part lost their
descendants to Judaism unless they remained at least somewhat observant.

I don’t claim every Jew must be Orthodox. But If
you dilute the religion to simply having feelings about something Jewish, you doom the future of Judaism. Yes, social justice is important and a
Jewish value, but it is not distinctively Jewish. Making this the primary ticket to Judaism removes the distinction
of Jews as a separate group. And no, just feeling Jewish inside isn’t enough.

Judaism is a religion, like it or not, and religion is about faith and about
God. Observe or not, that is your choice, but trying to take observance away
from it or making it obsolete cannot work, because in the end, it’s all
about truth, tradition, and feeling special.

Manhattan

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great letter....i think it really puts into concrete words the difference between "cultural" or "i was born jewish" and actually practicing and living jewish.
its not about being accepted by others, or "feeling jewish". As the letter states you can be both but you can't just "think" you are jewish by eating friday shabat dinner at Sammy's Roumanian.
By the way, the Nazis did not differentiate.

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