Cartoons And Politics
Wed, 02/06/2013
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In the Jan. 11 issue, Steve Greenberg’s cartoon makes a very ironic point.

His politics are usually to the left, while mine are to the right. His cartoon tries to make a point of moral equivalence between the rockets shot from Gaza into Israel with housing being “fired” from Israel into the West Bank.

The comparison is tragic, not morally equivalent. The Arabs are only interested in spreading random death and destruction with their rockets while the Israelis want to build homes for families to live in peace. The Arabs are only willing to accept that their land should be Judenrein while the Jews just want to live in peace and have shown on numerous occasions that they are willing to live together with peaceful Arabs as their neighbors. The Arabs (Mohammed Morsi, the Egyptian president, in 2010) call the Jews “descendants of apes and pigs” while there would be universal Jewish outrage if any Jew ever said anything derogatory about Islam. The Arabs (Fathi Shihab-Eddim, Morsi’s assistant responsible for appointing the editors of all state-run Egyptian newspapers, as reported in Fox News in late January), call the” Holocaust a hoax cooked up by the U.S. intelligence operatives and claimed the 6 million Jews who were killed by Nazis simply moved to the U.S.,” while the Jews continue to foolishly think that settlements in the West Bank are the obstruction to peace. When will we learn? It takes two to tango and to make peace.

Although Greenberg is trying to show the rockets and the housing to be morally equivalent, he unintentionally is pointing out how ludicrous the complaints about settlements are in the face of the terror and death of the rockets.

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