No Billionaire Left Behind

By day he is warning fellow Democrats that if Republicans win control of both chambers in November they'll put the interests of billionaires ahead of the middle class, and by night he has been fundraising among the super-wealthy who pay tens of thousands of dollars a plate to dine with him.

Ebbing Support For Israel Among Key Groups Stirring Alarm


Washington – If the results of a recent focus group and polls are any indication, the gap is growing between Congress and young Americans when it comes to support for Israel.

Taxpayers Should Sue Congress

Right now Speaker John Boehner's plans to sue President Obama for not enforcing the laws as the Republican leader thinks he should is a political ploy he may hope will serve to derail pressure in his caucus for impeachment, but it is one that can easily escalate because the inmates are running the asylum.

In New Brooklyn District, A Clash Of Clout

With fewer Jewish voters, Orthodox and Russian-speakers battle to elect a Councilman.
Staff Writer

A year after a City Council commission redrew the borders of some Council districts in Brooklyn, voters in the new 48th District will elect a representative for the first time on Tuesday.

Although redistricting reduced the number of Jewish voters in the 48th CD, all four candidates are Jewish. Image via Google Maps

Lhota Sees Hope in Frum Vote

Badly trailing in polls, Republican candidate is a regular in Borough Park and Williamsburg.
Assistant Managing Editor

As polls suggest the lopsided mayoral race is all but over, with Democrat Bill de Blasio a mile ahead, Republican Joe Lhota seems to be working overtime to pick up support in neighborhoods where Jews have been most willing to cross party lines.

Joseph Lhota speaks with shopkeeper Joseph Waldman during a visit to Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Shimon Gifter

Candidates Agree On Pressuring Iran

In "capital of the world," mayors need foreign policy, Lhota says.
Assistant Managing Editor

In a rare show of accord, both major candidates for mayor on Monday called for continued U.S. pressure on Iran to abandon its quest for nuclear weapons, as the country’s new president heads to Manhattan for the United Nations General Assembly.

President Hassan Rouhani’s overtures to the West, as he tries to strike a more conciliatory tone than his predecessor, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, have won him open ears in the State Department.

But Republican Joseph Lhota and Democrat Bill de Blasio joined a chorus of public figures outside UN headquarters calling for vigilance.

"We won't be fooled again," says de Blasio, left. "Words are not as important as actions," says Lhota. Adam Dickter

Jewish Democrat Council Leader Stepping Down


David Harris is leaving his job as president of the National Jewish Democratic Council.

"With the confidence of knowing that I’ve accomplished key goals here at NJDC that are central to our mission, I’m very much looking forward to new professional challenges and directions," Harris said in a statement released Wednesday after he announced his decision to the body's board.

Harris has helmed the group since 2009 and has worked to counter Republican efforts depicting President Obama as unfriendly to Israel.

Out on a high note: Harris moving on.

Choice. Period.

Jewish Week Online Columnist

It’s been a challenging, uplifting, infuriating, and inspiring few weeks for women. We’ve had a chance to hear from a number of thinkers and politicians on “both sides of the aisle,” and we have seen each person’s true colors when it comes to his/her thoughts about women’s rights.

Rabbi Marci N. Bellows

Jews as the New WASPS

As American census data suggests this nation is undergoing a significant and rapid change in its ethnic, racial and social orientation. For the first time in US history, racial and ethnic minorities outnumber caucasians – white births make up fewer than half the children born in the country, according to the US Census Bureau.

Are Younger Jews Paying their Dues? The Changing Landscape of Jewish Politics

Younger voters (those between the ages of 18-30) will be a target audience for both political parties this fall.

With the economic picture being bleak around job creation, higher gas prices, and the student loan debate, many younger voters may well be searching for political answers that meet their specific needs and concerns.

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