culture

Mind The (Pop Culture) Gap

06/25/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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Picturing the mid-20th-century New York that my parents grew up in, I always glimpsed it in black and white. It must have been, it felt to me, a world drained of color, something in between the grainy, dark photographs of my grandparents and the lustrous chiaroscuro of Alfred Hitchcock movies — films that I knew because my family convened after dinner every night around the family television set in the living room. Indeed, in an age before the Disney Channel and Nickelodeon, we watched Victor Borge concerts and Masterpiece Theatre together, just as we took it for granted that on family car trips, it was my father’s beloved classical music that was going to be on the radio.

Ted Merwin

Jews And The Arts, Players And Pundits

The Jewish Studies Center at Baruch College hosted an ambitious and absorbing program, “Jewish Arts and Identity in the Contemporary World” on May 7th. Three panels – on theater, music and the visual arts - were the core of the conference complemented by a performance by Audrey Flack and the Art History Band.

Sara Aharon, Telling the Afghani-Jewish story.

Staff Writer
05/22/2012

Sara Aharon, 26

www.fromkabultoqueens.com

Sara Aharon
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"“I’m a born-and-bred New Yorker,” Aharon said. While she knew her father was Afghani growing up, neither he nor his fellow Afghani Jews talked much about it.
-- Sara Aharon, 26

Is Judaism A Religion Or A Culture?

Conference on Moses Mendelssohn, new book fuel debate on thorny issues of faith, identity.

08/30/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The case for a new, fuller understanding of what defines Judaism.

As any Jew knows, trying to define what it means to be Jewish is difficult, if not impossible. Yet still we try: over the past two decades, the number of American Jews who define themselves as secular has nearly doubled; in Israel, a country founded on secular and nationalistic notions of Judaism, the religious population has risen dramatically. Fifty-eight percent of Israeli Jews now consider themselves either traditional or religious, while just 42 percent say they’re secular.

Leora Batnitzky

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