cooking

Cooking Our Way Through The Holidays

A couple of weeks ago, my family and I spent five amazing days at Tikvah Family Camp at Ramah in the Poconos, connecting with other families who have children with a range of special needs and enjoying camp life. During the mornings, children are paired with “Chavereem” who lead them in sports, art, swimming and other activities while parents get time to themselves. One of my highlights from this year’s camp was when I met up with my 11-year-old son, George, who has autism, and his lovely Chavera Davida at lunch. “George LOVED cooking!” Davida exclaimed. “He was so focused and into it. He did a great job.”

I smiled. George and I have been cooking together since he was four, when a cognitive-behavioral therapist recommended cooking as a way for us to engage in back and forth sharing and connecting. I thought she was crazy; at that time, George’s behavior was so hyper that he might only focus on a preferred activity for a minute at a time.

The author cooking with her children. Courtesy of Gabrielle Kaplan-Mayer

Cooking For Michael Pollan

An intrepid chef sets out to prepare dinner for the "God of Healthy Food."

07/16/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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Driving through the California farmland near my home, I was listening closely to an interview on National Public Radio with Michael Pollan. He’s a hero in these parts, and I was really surprised to hear him say that he’s had to eat restaurant food while on tour for his new book, “Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation.”

Michael Pollan. Photo credit: Alia Malley

Simple. Beautiful. Kushner.

Schmoozing and snacking with Kim Kushner at her book signing.

06/06/2013
Food & Wine Editor
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Kim Kushner signs copies of her cookbook at Eli's supermarket. Emma Goss
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A pleasant garlic aroma from the pistachio pesto farfalle scented the room
Heirloom tomatoes with mint and cilantro were light and fresh

The Book On Mediterranean Cooking

05/08/2013

Recommended cookbooks include “Jerusalem” by Ottolenghi and Tamimi (Ten Speed Press), which isn’t a kosher cookbook, but can easily be adapted for kosher kitchens.

Shabbos Cooking

How do you make the perfect meatball? Video blogger Aaron Herman shows you in his latest video.

Making The Holidays Sweeter

Rosh Hashanah is a time for family to come together and eat. We spoke with Doris Schechter author and owner of My Most Favorite Food about innovative kosher food.

Gooey Cinnamon Buns

Conquer any fears of yeast with these delicious treats.

05/20/2011
Editorial Assistant

I have a few fears in my life. Spiders. Cockroaches. Ants. Flies. Ladybugs. Being in the same room as any of the above. And for the longest time, there was another thing on that list: yeast.

Baking with yeast terrified me, the "will it rise" question taunting me from underneath the covered bowl set in the corner of the kitchen. Will I put in all this work - mixing and kneading and rolling - to end up with a flat, inedible bread?

Conquer any fears of yeast with these delicious treats. Photo by Amy Spiro

Life Lessons from Manischewitz

04/14/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

While I was secretly hoping that Kate and William might need a keynote speaker for their big day, I was not surprised that my invitation to the royal wedding never arrived. I can also say that, as a cheerful and frequent host of many Shabbat dinners, I am far from astounded when my family gets invited out to usher in the Sabbath around someone else's dining room table.

Deborah Grayson Riege

First-Ever Translation of Yiddish Cookbook Yields Old World Treasures, New World Advice

04/08/2011
JTA

TEL AVIV (JTA) -- When a rare volume of a 1914 cookbook written in Yiddish for American Jewish housewives came into the hands of Bracha Weingrod, the once popular but forgotten book began its long journey from dusty oblivion to celebrated translation.

The thick, worn copy of “Dos Familien Kokh-Bookh,” now newly translated by Weingrod as “The Yiddish Family Cookbook,” appears to be the only Yiddish cookbook now on the market.

Pumpkin Cupcakes

Extend Thanksgiving with a fall-flavored treat.

11/26/2010
Editorial Assistant
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You might still be full from yesterday’s feast. But if there’s any room left in your stomach, and any pumpkin puree waiting around in the fridge, bake up these cupcakes and you won’t be disappointed. 

Pumpkin puree in a can is a pretty ubiquitous product, but I figured it would be way more fun to make it from scratch, so I lugged home a 5 pound pumpkin, sliced it up and roasted, scooped out and pureed the flesh. I can’t say I endorse making your own pumpkin puree as a time-saving method, but it was certainly an experience.

Pumpkin Cupcakes with Cinnamon Cream Cheese Frosting
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