cookbook

The Balaboosta of Mulberry Street

Cookbook author, restauranteur, chef, wife, mother. Meet Einat Admony.

08/19/2013
Jewish Week Book Critic
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A century ago, the tenements of Mulberry Street were filled with Italian nonni, or grandmothers, who cooked and cleaned and shopped with a take-charge style and amazing skill.

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Jewish Cooking In America

Joan Nathan on her perception of herself as pesto, and how butter makes a babka better.

07/02/2013
Food & Wine Editor
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If you ask Joan Nathan to name just one of her favorite Jewish foods, she'll tell you at least four. Spend just five minutes listening to her poetically muse about the menu for her upcoming Shabbat dinner, and you'll quickly see how Nathan is more than a talented food writer and cook, she's an inventor and an innovator. Nathan is one of the most recognizable and respected names in Jewish cooking, having written 10 cookbooks and hosted two seasons of "Jewish Cooking in America," a PBS show based on her award-winning cookbook of the same title (season 2 is due out on DVD this summer). Though she's busy giving lectures and performing cooking demonstrations, writing articles for Tablet Magazine The New York Times and other publications, and working on her 11th cookbook, Nathan made time to chat with me about her fondness for making challah from scratch and the key to being a truly great food writer.

Joan has 10 cookbooks to her name and a PBS show. Photo courtesy Joan Nathan

Shakshuka, Sabra-Style

Taglit-Birthright's online cookbook globalizes Israeli cooking.

04/05/2013
Food & Wine Editor

After returning from a trip to Israel, it's difficult to find falafel in the United States that lives up to the deliciousness of the one you had on Ben Yehudah, or anywhere in Israel for that matter. But that's all about to change.

Pita and hummus recipes featured in the cookbook.

First-Ever Translation of Yiddish Cookbook Yields Old World Treasures, New World Advice

04/08/2011
JTA

TEL AVIV (JTA) -- When a rare volume of a 1914 cookbook written in Yiddish for American Jewish housewives came into the hands of Bracha Weingrod, the once popular but forgotten book began its long journey from dusty oblivion to celebrated translation.

The thick, worn copy of “Dos Familien Kokh-Bookh,” now newly translated by Weingrod as “The Yiddish Family Cookbook,” appears to be the only Yiddish cookbook now on the market.

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