conversion bill

Cautious Optimism For Expanding Conversion Process In Israel

Leaders of liberal religious movements favor bill to include more rabbis in the process; Netanyahu is opposed.

10/29/2014
Staff Writer

Reform and Conservative Jewish leaders here are cautiously bracing for a Knesset debate on a bill in Israel designed to increase the number of conversions to Judaism.

"Off the Mark" on Rotem Conversion Bill

08/11/2010

Gary Rosenblatt does not hesitate to tackle difficult matters, but his latest column about the Rotem Conversion Bill is off the mark.

For more than 15 years, as well as in our several meetings with MK David Rotem, we have emphasized our strong desire to address the issue of the status of olim from the former Soviet Union. There are multiple ways in which the situation could be meaningfully addressed.

Media: Clinton’s Rabbi Is Mainstream, Israel’s Rabbis ‘Extreme’

Victories for intermarriage against the ‘narrow.’

08/10/2010
Associate Editor

 

Maybe some Orthodox Jews are feeling “triumphalist” these days, with their high birthrates, high degrees of Jewish literacy and low assimilation rates, but to read the papers lately is to see Orthodoxy as a Palooka getting pummeled in a Pier 6 brawl. Between Chelsea Clinton’s intermarriage and the shelved conversion bill in Israel, the Orthodox are certainly getting the worst of it.

 

Orthodox Rabbis were called "extreme" but not Rabbi James Ponet, above.

With Conversion Bill Postponed, What’s Next?

Can 400,000 of Israel’s Russians be absorbed into society without alienating non-Orthodox Jews?

07/27/2010
Staff Writer

Although some American Jewish leaders said this week that they will be entering upcoming negotiations over the proposed Israeli conversion bill free of preconceptions, a leader of Reform Jewry said there remains a “red line” for his movement.

 “The critical point will be giving ultimate authority to the Chief Rabbinate, which is a fundamental violation of the status quo,” said Rabbi Eric Yoffie, president of the Union for Reform Judaism. “In my opinion, that is the red line.

The Damage Done, and the Task Ahead

07/26/2010

The crisis in Israel over the so-called Rotem Bill regarding conversion practices and who should control them has been averted, at least for now. The bill was not brought to the floor for a vote because its sponsor realized he was short of the votes needed for passage.

Only the truly naïve about how these things work believe that this is the end of the story. Like a retrovirus, this issue of “who is a Jew” will surely rear its ugly head again in the not too distant future.

Netanyahu brokers six-month freeze on conversion bill

07/22/2010

 An agreement has been reached to put a six-month freeze on a controversial Israeli conversion bill up for a vote in the Knesset.

Conversion Controversy: A Perfect Storm (And A Way Out)

07/20/2010

The showdown over a controversial conversion bill in the Knesset will likely be averted for the moment. But any sigh of relief you may hear around the Jewish world is premature. 

Gary Rosenblatt

In Bill, Dangerous Precedent Given To Chief Rabbinate

07/20/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Who opposes Knesset member David Rotem’s proposed conversion legislation?

In Israel, Bibi Netanyahu, the Likud prime minister, who has displayed vision and political courage in rebuffing efforts to pass it in its current form this week; and Labor, Kadima and Meretz, joined by a number of Likud members. This opposition reflects something Rotem, a member of the Yisrael Beiteinu party, does not appreciate: a clear recognition of the importance of the Reform and Conservative movement worldwide to Israel and the Jewish people. 

Netanyahu Tells Cabinet He Opposes Rotem Conversion Bill

07/18/2010

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he opposes a proposed conversion bill, which "could tear apart the Jewish people."

Netanyahu made the comments Sunday at the regular Cabinet meeting.

The bill, which has been roundly condemned by the Reform and Conservative movements in the United States, Israel and in other countries in the Diaspora because it centralizes conversion in the hands of the Orthodox Rabbinate, could come up for a first reading this week.

The conversion bill now before Knesset will:

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