Conservative Movement

United Synagogue Of Conservative Judaism Selling Its Real Estate

01/22/2015

The United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism is selling its New York office.

The organization announced Wednesday that it signed a contract last month to sell its two-floor condo in midtown Manhattan for $15.9 million. Proceeds from the sale of the Second Avenue property will go toward paying down its debt, renting new office space and establishing a foundation to fund ongoing programs, United Synagogue said.

USY Drops Ban On Interdating

12/29/2014

United Synagogue Youth voted to relax its rules barring its teenage board members from dating non-Jews.

Prominent Conservative Rabbi Considers Breaking Intermarriage Ban

12/19/2014

For a few days at least, Rabbi Wesley Gardenswartz appeared ready to become the first prominent Conservative clergyman to break with the movement’s ironclad rule against rabbis performing intermarriages. But shortly after floating the idea to his congregants  at Temple Emanuel in Newton, Mass., one of the nation’s largest Conservative synagogues, he reversed course.

Dermer Expresses ‘Deep Disappointment’ In U.S. Call On P.A. Unity

06/03/2014

WASHINGTON — In tough language rare for an Israeli diplomat in Washington, Israeli ambassador Ron Dermer said Israel was ‘deeply disappointed’ in the State Department’s decision to continue dealing with the Palestinian Authority now that it has Hamas support.

Write No Requiem For The Conservative Movement

To live as a Conservative Jew in America in the 21st century is a blessing, not a curse.

11/15/2013

In the forthcoming Winter issue of the Jewish Review of Books, a colleague and friend of many years, Rabbi Daniel Gordis, has written an article titled “Requiem for a Movement,” referring to the Conservative movement in the aftermath of the recently released Pew Report.  As one might imagine, the article has generated a great deal of “discussion” among my colleagues in the Conservative rabbinate.  I can only imagine that the lay leadership of our movement is similarly engaged.

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik is spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center.

The Novel As Archive

Dara Horn delves into the nature of remembrance, and how it ‘affects our choices for the future,’ in ‘A Guide for the Perplexed.’

10/16/2013
Jewish Week Book Critic

Dara Horn’s latest novel is propelled forward by ideas about preserving the past, over three different eras. “A Guide for the Perplexed” (Norton) is set in present-day California and Egypt, late-19th-century Cambridge and Cairo, and further back, in 12th-century Cairo. With great skill and originality, she layers stories of a software developer who invents a program called “Genizah” for recording a life, Solomon Schechter’s discovery of the Cairo Genizah, and the life of Moses Maimonides, or the Rambam.

Horn of plenty: Her new book travels from Cairo to California.

At Conservative Judaism Convention, Leaders Focus On Shrinkage

BALTIMORE — At their biennial convention, Conservative Jewish leaders called for renewing the “vital religious center” of American Judaism in the wake of numerous studies showing their movement is shrinking.

Beyond Burial

The problem of prayerbooks: awash in holy books, synagogues ponder how to collectively, creatively dispose of old friends.

02/15/2013

After years of watching synagogue members die or move away, the Sephardic Jewish Center of Canarsie made the difficult decision to downsize.

Synagogues that upgrade to newer editions of prayer books often have to bury the old ones. Adam Jones/Creative Commons

A Guide To Living A Serious Jewish Life

Major new book by Conservative rabbis offers thoughtful essays on wide range of knotty issues.

10/11/2012
Associate Editor

At a time when denominational walls seem to be growing ever higher, the new religious guidebook from the Conservative movement’s Rabbinical Assembly is meant for all “contemporary Jews,” not necessarily just Conservative ones.

The Conservative Movement's new guidebook is as vast and ambitious as a Russian novel, and as long.

Technology vs. Shabbat: An Interview with Rabbi Daniel Nevins

E-books became the dominant format for adult fiction in 2011 surpassing hardcover books and paperbacks according to the BookStats annual survey. We are increasingly choosing to read our novels, magazine, newspapers and even children’s books on e-readers and tablets. But is it permissible to do this on the one day of the week that Judaism commands us to unplug?

Rabbi Daniel Nevins answers questions concerning the use of technology on Shabbat.
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