Conservative Jews

What Conservative Judaism Has To Offer

02/11/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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It’s hard to be in the middle. Politically, the far right has put mainstream Republicans on the defensive, and the left has sent centrist Democrats scurrying to identify with populism. Religiously, fundamentalism on the right has opposed any form of change, and an aggressive atheism on the left has mounted a war against traditional beliefs. Yet, while the extremes may sometimes foment revolutions, the middle keeps society going. And the middle is the hardest place to be.

Francine Klagsbrun

Why I’m A Conservative Jew, Hopeful About The Future

01/21/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Liberal religion is having a hard time these days. Mainstream Protestant Christianity is a graying movement with significant numbers of its churches closing. Pope Francis expressed his fears that in emphasizing issues of social justice the Catholic Church not suffer the same fate as these Protestant churches have. The daughters of Muslim women who gloried in uncovering their hair are succeeded by their daughters who insist on headdresses. In all three, the “fundamentalist” wings of these churches seem to be robust and, at least among Protestants and Muslims, ascendant. It should not surprise us that the Pew Research Center study has now shown that these trends are similarly true for Jews. 

Rabbi Edward Feld

Why I’m A Conservative Jew, Hopeful About The Future

01/07/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
Story Includes Video: 
0

Liberal religion is having a hard time these days.  Mainstream Protestant Christianity is a graying movement with significant numbers of its churches closing.  Pope Francis expressed his fears that in emphasizing issues of social justice the Catholic Church not suffer the same fate as these Protestant churches have. The daughters of Moslem women who gloried in uncovering their hair are succeeded by their daughters who insist on headdresses.   In all three, the “fundamentalist” wings of these churches seem to be robust and, at least among Protestants and Moslems, ascendant.  It should not surprise us that the Pew Study has now shown that these trends are similarly true for Jews. 

We Talk A Good Game

03/20/2013
Editor and Publisher

http://www.russellberriefoundation.org/initiative_jr_ujafederation.phpHow much, if any, cooperation and collaboration can there be — or should there be — among Reform, Conservative and Orthodox communities, starting with their rabbis?

Gary Rosenblatt

To Revitalize Conservative Jewry, Build On Camp Ramah

02/05/2013
Special To The Jewish Week

Those of us who have grown up in the Conservative movement have heard the conventional wisdom for years — Camp Ramah is the best and most successful program that the movement ever developed. We would even hear this from Jews across the spectrum who admire with envy this jewel of a program that formed lifetime bonds among alumni and created a community of knowledgeable, proud, energized, committed, Zionist young Jews.

Are Synagogues Still Relevant?

03/15/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The recent release of a draft strategic plan for the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism (USCJ) is simply the latest indicator of the challenge facing non-Orthodox Judaism in the United States. The USCJ press release was accompanied by data showing that the movement has lost 14 percent of their affiliated families since 2001, and twice that percentage in the Northeast Region.

Conservative Movement’s College Kids Mobilize

New coalition fights cuts to campus services,
but with little success.

03/08/2011
Staff Writer

A protest by students over the planned reorganization of the Conservative movement’s Koach college program has won an acknowledgement that the program is important — but little else.

“There has been no concrete change,” said Rabbi Steven Wernick, executive vice president and CEO of the United Synagogue for Conservative Judaism.

He stressed that the planned reorganization never contemplated an end of Koach but rather that it have a “more narrow focus on campus because of [limited] resources.”

Rabbi Steven Wernick, CEO of the United Synagogue for Conservative Judaism.
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