Citi Field

Court Upholds Ban On Kosher Food At Shabbat Met Games

03/14/2013

You can still buy peanuts and cracker jacks, but kosher hot dogs won't be available at New York Mets games when the Amazin's play on Friday night or Saturday.

A federal appeals court told a kosher hot dog vendor in New York that its agreement with Citi Field precludes it from selling kosher products at the stadium on Shabbat.

Kosher Sports Inc. had a 10-year contract with Citi Field, home of the New York Mets, to sell hot dogs, sausages and other kosher products in the stadium through October 2018. In 2010, the kosher food distributor sued Citi Field operators for preventing its workers from selling their products on Friday nights and Saturdays, and for attempting to stop the company from obtaining a fourth food cart.

A caterer struck out in his attempt to sell kosher hot dogs on Saturday at Citi Field.

Part I: Haredi Schools Reap Millions In Federal Tech Funds

How does a community that rails against the Web pull in $30 million in one year for its schools from the E-rate program?

02/15/2013

Editor's Note: This article is the first of three parts. Click for part 2. Click for part 3.

At Yeshivat Avir Yakov, an all-boys school in the chasidic enclave of New Square in New York’s Rockland County, students spend the vast majority of their long school days studying religious texts in spartan classrooms furnished only with battered wooden benches and desks. Unlike their counterparts in public or private schools outside the chasidic community, the boys at Avir Yakov do not have access to the Internet or computers in their school because chasidic leaders view the Internet as a corrupting force capable of undermining their way of life.

This past summer, the fervently Orthodox filled two stadiums to rally against the Internet. Getty Images

Ultra-Orthodox are Correct About the Dangers of the Internet

When I first heard that a rally was planned for Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) Jews to protest the Internet, I didn’t think it would attract much attention. After all, the Internet has long been under attack in Haredi communities and their rabbinic leaders have forbidden it in the past.

Take Me Out Of The Ballgame

05/22/2012
Editorial

The notion of 40,000 haredi and chasidic men coming out on a lovely Sunday evening to Citi Field — a sell-out crowd — not to watch a Mets game but to decry the evils of the Internet makes the attendees of this week’s rally an easy target for ridicule to many people. After all, the Internet is a reality, and prayer and preaching won’t make it go away.

The Anti-Internet Rally: Broken Truths

05/20/2012

This is why the Internet asifa (the large-scale rally, planned by haredim against the Internet, which took place on Sunday night at Citi Field) is important for K’lal Yisroel: because a wholesome lie is better than any broken truth; because denial must be protected at all costs; because ignorance is sacred in a world whose existence depends on it.

Haredi Leaders Plan Rally At Citi Field to Highlight Internet’s Dangers

04/29/2012

Haredi Orthodox leaders are planning what they say will be a massive rally in New York City to call attention to the dangers of modern digital technology.

Tens of thousands are expected to gather for a May 20 rally at Citi Field, the Mets' baseball stadium in Queens. The Hebrew-language Jewish Daily News reported that $1.5 million has been raised so far from donors to pay for the event.

Haredi Leaders Plan Rally At Citi Field to Highlight Internet’s Dangers

04/29/2012

Haredi Orthodox leaders are planning what they say will be a massive rally in New York City to call attention to the dangers of modern digital technology.

Tens of thousands are expected to gather for a May 20 rally at Citi Field, the Mets' baseball stadium in Queens. The Hebrew-language Jewish Daily News reported that $1.5 million has been raised so far from donors to pay for the event.

When An Israeli Team Played At The Polo Grounds, Shibe Park and Ebbets Field

This coming Sunday's Jewish Heritage Day at Citi Field, presented by the Mets and the JCRC, is always a terrific day at the ballpark, and the Mets deserve our gratitude. Last winter, the Hebron Fund rented out a room at Citi Field for a fundraiser on behalf of one of Israel's oldest and holiest communities, a community that has lived in Hebron almost continuously since Biblical times, until wiped out in the Arab pogrom of 1929 and reconstituted shortly after the Six-Day War in 1967.

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