chuppah

Covering All The Bases

Drawn to its symbolism, non-Jews are increasingly getting married under the chupah.

Special To The Jewish Week
06/13/2013

When Lorelei Gilmore, the unwed Connecticut mother on the award-winning sitcom, “Gilmore Girls,” was about to tie the knot in a 2001 episode, she was astonished to see her friend, Luke, drag an elaborate wooden chupah onto her lawn. She reminded him that neither she nor the groom, Max, was Jewish. “Don’t you have to be Jewish to get married under one of these?” she asked, gesturing to the structure, with its hand-carved images of birds, flowers and a sacrificial goat. “Won’t God smite us?”

A non-Jewish couple under the chupah in Austin, Texas. Sarah Q. Photography

A Rabbi's New Wedding Role -- As Bride

04/05/2013
Jewish Week Online Columnist

As some of my readers may remember, I am getting married later this month. I feel so lucky to have met my soulmate, and our relationship gets stronger and stronger as the months pass. And, though I’ve officiated at dozens and dozens of weddings, I find myself feeling as though we are creating the whole thing from scratch. I guess I expected myself to be an expert on all things wedding, but I’ve learned the lesson that you are probably all anticipating: it’s always different when it is your own event!

Rabbi Marci N. Bellows

From Model Seders To Chupahs: Everyone Wants To Be A Shtickle Jewish

Families shopping for kosher l’Pesach food items. Couples marrying under a chupah, signing a ketubah, breaking a glass.

Some recent stories in American newspapers.

Old news.

But none of the above are Jewish.

As we wring our hands about Jewish continuity, asking who will carry on Jewish traditions, the answer appears more and more to be: gentiles.

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