christians

Israeli Institute Gets $2.2 Million To Help Christians Study Jewish Thought

10/14/2014
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A new institute in Jerusalem has been awarded $2.2 million to help Christians and Jews study Jewish texts, launching what’s being billed as a new kind of Jewish-Christian cooperation.

Vandals Strike Christian Village Near Safed

04/03/2014

JERUSALEM  — The tires of 40 cars and trucks were slashed and a hateful message was spray-painted on a wall in a Christian village near Safed.

Toward A Gentler Orthodoxy

Godly people strive to understand each other; good people can differ out of pure motives.

03/19/2014

Throughout the Middle Ages, Jews and Christians were consumed by hateful polemics about each other. They fought theological duels that sometimes led to deadly Christian violence against our ancestors. Christians no longer pose any existential threat to Jews, yet the penchant for hateful language has continued, particularly in my Orthodox community. Much of this venom is directed against ourselves in fraternal battles that are turning as lethal as the medieval Jewish-Christian warfare. Today the traditional fear and vilification of gentiles has been transferred to other Orthodox Jews with whom we disagree.

The recent decision by a school to allow girls to wear teffillin has created controversy, sometimes mean-spirited. Fotolia

Why I Love Ash Wednesday

I live in Hoboken, a town of churches (and 1 synagogue – hi, Rabbi Scheinberg!) This small city’s Catholic character is obvious to any casual visitor, and certainly struck us strongly when we were scouting the place out and toured many apartments for sale above whose pristine beds, plumped up attractively for prospective buyers, sat crucifixes large and small. In fact, one of my neighbors has in her living room two huge portraits: one of Frank Sinatra, and one of the Pope.

A Catholic woman prays with an ash cross on her forehead in Washington, D.C. in 2012. Getty Images

Civil Discourse: Reclaiming the Higher Ground

10/11/2012
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Even the most casual observer of the Jewish community over recent years will have noticed that we Jews seem to have a problem talking nicely to each other.  Because this problem usually manifests itself publicly around thorny and contentious issues, it’s easy to read it as the inevitable result of the passions generated by the issues themselves, and not necessarily the people involved.

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is the spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center in Queens.

Athens and Jerusalem: The Case for Knowing the Classics

In our secular, liberal age, the Bible and the classics often get a bad rap.  The Bible represents everything modernity is not—free inquiry, divested of hoary beliefs—while the classics are often snidely dismissed as the hubristic fantasies of aging, if not already dead white males.

Should Christians Read the Bible More Like Jews?

In his usually precise and incisive way, critic Adam Kirsch tackles a thorny issue: should Christians read their Bible like Jews read theirs?  The occasion is a new book--"The Rise and Fall of the Bible: The Unexpected History of an Accidental Book"--by Case Western religion professor Timothy Beal, who is also the child of evangelical parents. 

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