charitable giving

Survey: Jews Give Less To Their Congregations Than Non-Jews Do

01/13/2014
Staff Writer
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Most American Jews give at least some of their charitable donations to organizations that have some connection to Jewish life, although a substantial part of the community continues to give generously to non-Jewish causes, according to a new demographic study to be released later this week.

Jewish Giving Strong, But Concerns Loom, New Study Finds

‘Engagement’ seen as key, but communal motivation for giving fraying.

09/04/2013
Editor and Publisher
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On the surface, the major findings of the just-released National Study of American Jewish Giving are encouraging, indicating that Jews have one of the highest levels of charity of any group in America, contributing generously to both Jewish and non-Jewish causes.

Younger Jews are less tied to federated giving, a new study says. Graphic courtesy Jumpstart

Sylvia's Table

Liz Neumark's Sylvia Center gives disadvantaged kids a healthy dose of farm life and plenty to chew on.

08/13/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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Liz Neumark realizes that she may not be able to change the world. But she’d like to change the next meal for people who don’t yet understand the links between farm and table, between a carrot that’s just been pulled out of the ground and an unforgettably flavorful dinner.

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Slump in Charitable Giving Could Last Until 2022

 

The continued softness in charitable giving is hitting synagogues especially hard, and non-profits in general are facing a slog back toward recovery from recession that could take as long as a decade.

2011 donations were almost flat

Keeping Pace With Nature's Fury

As a succession of disasters strike, Jewish relief organizations struggle to raise enough funds to respond.

09/12/2008
Editorial Intern

Almost four years after the 2004 tsunami in South Asia, one of the deadliest natural disasters in history, relief and rebuilding efforts in the affected areas are far from over.
But in the years since, disasters and crises in other areas of the world have also demanded attention and humanitarian aid, including the cyclone in Burma and the earthquake in Sichuan, China, both of which hit in May of this year, and more recently the war in South Ossetia, Georgia. Add to that the damage on U.S. soil from a succession of tropical storms and hurricanes.

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