CCAR

Revive – Don’t Resign From --The Conference Of Presidents

06/03/2014
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Emotions have run high in some quarters in recent weeks, since J Street failed to win membership in the Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations. Like the Reform Movement’s other three Conference member organizations, the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the rabbinic leadership organization of Reform Judaism, voted in favor of J Street’s application.

Rabbi Richard A. Block

Why -- And How -- I Officiate

A Reform rabbi explains her decision to begin uniting interfaith couples under the chuppah.

02/10/2014
Jewish Week Online Columnist
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There has been a great deal of press lately about interfaith marriages within the Jewish community, including an article by Rabbi Rick Jacobs, President of the Union for Reform Judaism in which he proclaimed that young people “must hear from their Jewish leaders that interfaith couples can be and are supported in their effort to raise deeply committed Jewish families.”

Cheryl Silvers and Eric Doades sign the ketubah at their interfaith wedding. Courtesy of Cheryl Silvers and Eric Doades

Welcome To Our World: The Rabbinate Rejects Orthodox Jews, Too

01/09/2014
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It was inevitable. Once they came after Reform, Conservative and other progressive Jews, it was only a matter of time until the Chief Rabbinate turned on other Orthodox Jews.

Rabbi Steven A. Fox

Major Pay Gap For Reform Women Rabbis

Despite movement’s stated commitment to equal pay, women earn as much as $43,000 less than their male colleagues.

06/26/2012
Staff Writer
Forty years after Sally Priesand became the Reform movement’s first woman rabbi, Reform women rabbis continue to dramatically trail their male counterparts in pay. A study conducted by the movement’s Central Conference of American Rabbis found that women earn as much as $43,000 less annually. The study also documented the relatively small number of women rabbis leading large Reform congregations.
“We are fighting today for some of the same issues I fought for 40 years ago,” says Rabbi Sally Priesand.

Prayer on the Go? There’s an App for That!

12/08/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

I slowly walked down the stairs, brain still half asleep, eyes half-closed. I saw my dad seated at my dining room table, wide awake, staring intently into his Kindle. My parents were in town for the High Holy Days, a time of year we hadn’t spent together in a long time. “Whatcha reading?” I mumbled, mid-yawn, and he promptly told me that he was enjoying his early morning Rashi. Rashi – on his Kindle! And then he was planning on studying a bit of Talmud before continuing with his day.

Rabbi Marci N. Bellows

Kol Chatan v’Kol Chatan: Celebrating with Groom and Groom

11/09/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

 

Among the variety of incredible lifecycle moments throughout a Jewish life, it goes without saying that a wedding is certainly one of the sweetest to experience. Surrounded by family and friends, dressed in our finest, cameras at the ready, taking part in a wedding celebration has always been considered one of the greatest mitzvot for us to perform.

Rabbi Marci N. Bellows

The Future's So Bright: Are Reform Rabbis Ready for the 21st Century?

04/01/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

Hundreds of Reform Rabbis traveled to New Orleans… sounds like the start of a joke, yes? This past week marked the 122nd Annual Convention of the Central Conference of American Rabbis - the CCAR - and, yes, this year's convention was held in New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Rabbi Marci N. Bellows

Why is Patrilineal Descent Not Catching On in Reform Worldwide?

02/13/2011
JTA

SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) -- For three decades now, the American Jewish Reform movement has considered as Jewish the child of a Jewish father and non-Jewish mother who is raised as a Jew.

But most Reform Jews in the rest of the world still do not accept “patrilineal descent.”

That makes the debate about “Who is a Jew” not just between the Orthodox-dominated Israeli Rabbinate and American Jewish liberal movements, but also between American Reform Judaism and most of the Diaspora.

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