death and dying

Judge Orders Feeding Tube

Staff Writer
Terri Schiavo might still be alive had she been in a hospice in New York State rather than Florida. A Queens Supreme Court justice, citing state and Orthodox Jewish law, ruled last week that a feeding tube is not medicine and must be inserted into a patient who cannot swallow unless the patient had provided explicit instructions to the contrary.

‘He Was A Real Mensch’

Staff Writer
In death, 14-year-old Jacob Greenberg of Merrick, L.I., may save lives. The ninth-grader at the Hebrew Academy of the Five Towns and Rockaway and some friends were tossing around a football last week on the school’s front lawn when he collapsed. The school nurse administered CPR, and a nearby Hatzalah ambulance crew arrived within minutes and tried to revive him using a defibrillator.

Extraordinary Loss

Staff Writer
Marcus Kranz escaped Hitler's gas chambers by working in a labor camp in Romania while the rest of his family (his sister and parents) perished. But in a cruel irony, he and five others in his son's Long Island home succumbed to another kind of gas, carbon monoxide. Police said the central air conditioner in the Roslyn Heights home of Kranz's son, Andrei, apparently circulated the deadly fumes from an improperly vented furnace that had been left on.

'He Was Trying To Find His Niche'

Staff Writer
While he was a second-year student at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1992, Gary (Gidone) Busch was diagnosed with a potentially fatal disease that changed his life. "He learned that he had a kidney disease that causes partial renal failure, and a nephrologist told him it could be life threatening," recalled his brother, Glenn, 39, a Manhattan lawyer.

A Short And Meaningful Life

Staff Writer
Another Jewish hero was lost two weeks ago, this one on the ground, only a few miles from Ground Zero, where his uncle perished on Sept. 11. Just a few days before Col. Ilan Ramon was killed in the Shuttle Columbia disaster, Saul and Sue Zucker of North Massapequa, L.I., who lost a son, Andrew, on 9-11, learned that their 20-year-old firefighter grandson was killed while driving to school in Brookville, L.I.

Tragedy And A Mystery

Associate Editor
‘Now you have been found and we are lost.” With those words, spoken just steps from her son’s casket, Gitty Bender encapsulated the ambiguity surrounding the death of her son, Joshua.

'Rabbi Of Rabbis' Dies

Staff Writer
Rabbi Mordecai Waxman of Great Neck, L.I., a giant of Conservative Jewry and the only rabbi to be knighted by the Pope for his work in fostering Catholic-Jewish relations, was eulogized at his funeral Tuesday as the "rabbi of rabbis." Rabbi Waxman, surrounded by his family, died at his home Saturday at the age of 85 following a brief illness. More than 1,000 mourners attended the funeral at Temple Israel in Great Neck, where Rabbi Waxman served as spiritual leader for 55 years. He was slated to retire at the end of this month.

A Plot With Painful Twists

Staff Writer
After her husband’s death in 1988, Florence Mormor of the City Line section of Brooklyn contacted her husband’s family burial society and bought him a grave and another for herself. After a few weeks, she called the cemetery, Mount Hebron in Flushing, Queens, and learned that the grave next to her husband’s had not been reserved for her. She then called but failed to speak with the officer of the society, Trembowler True Sisters, who had deposited her check but never acknowledged it in writing or sent her a deed for the plot.

Unveiling For Local Couple

Staff Writer
Family and friends of Joseph and Sylvia Landow remembered them Oct. 5 during the joint unveiling of their headstones at New Montefiore Cemetery in Farmingdale. The Landows, who were both 96 when they died three weeks apart last spring at the Gurwin Jewish Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Commack, had been married 65 years and had devoted their lives to Israel, Judaism and family.
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