weddings

Weddings In A Time Of War

The recent Gaza conflict was tough on simcha preparations. ‘I was prepared to get married in the backyard if necessary,’ a bride says.

Israel Correspondent
12/04/2012

Jerusalem — Months ago, when Pnina Weiss was planning her late-November wedding, she spent a lot of time choosing the hall, the menu, the photographer.

What Weiss couldn’t anticipate was that a war would make it impossible to tie the knot in her fiancé, Shimon’s, hometown of Ashkelon, located just a few miles from Israel’s border with Gaza.

A week before their big day, Israel’s Home Front Command began prohibiting gatherings of over 100 people in the south of the country.

An Israeli couple, posed for photos at the Western Wall while a prayer vigil,held during the recent war between Israel and Hamas

A Twist On Tradition

Old becomes new as couples personalize wedding ceremonies.

06/12/2012

Washington — In the months before his wedding, Jon Cetel cringed at the notion of having his friends dance him to his bride at a traditional bedeken ceremony, where he would place the veil over her face.

The concept “was completely foreign to me,” he said. It “felt too traditional.”

But his bride, Ashley Novack, 26, was entranced by the tradition. “I love dancing, and this sounded like an amazing opportunity definitely not to be missed,” she said.

Mike Peretz reads a personal statement to his bride, Sara Cohen. JTA

The iPad Wedding

I've written on this blog about Jewish weddings and other Jewish life cycle events that have welcomed Skype technology. The newest way to bring loved ones from far way into the simcha is through an iPad or other tablet device. 

Rabbi Rachel Kobrin watched the grandfather of the bride deliver a wedding speech via iPad

Bad Day At The Mikveh, Good Day At The Beach

Huffington Post has a provocative piece this week by Jessica Langer-Sousa, a self-described “observant” Jewish woman who wanted to go to the mikveh before her wedding to a “devout” Catholic. (The quotation marks aren’t intended to be snide, but just to note that since “observant” and “devout” are both somewhat subject-to-interpretation adjectives that she doesn’t define, I am not sure what they mean in this context.)

After being rebuffed by the mikveh lady at one Los Angeles spot, Langer-Sousa consulted with “Rabbi Lori,” the rabbi officiating at her nuptials, and opted instead to dunk in the Pacific. The ceremony turned out to be even more meaningful and spiritual than she’d anticipated.

You might think my knee-jerk “In The Mix” reaction would be to indignantly side with Langer-Sousa as she rails against the (presumably Orthodox) mikveh lady, who told her she wouldn’t be permitted in the ritual bath because her marriage would not be recognized in the eyes of God. But, while the mikveh at the beach sounds great, I actually found the piece troubling. 

Interfaith Wedding Planning

As I’ve mentioned here before, Homeshuling blogger Amy Meltzer and I have an almost eerie amount in common.

We both have two elementary-school-age daughters (hers are Ella and Zoe, mine are Ellie and Sophie), are married to French Canadian high school history teachers, are alumni of crunchy liberal arts colleges and love Eden Village Camp, where we met in person a few months ago — and where I’m dropping Ellie off tomorrow for her first overnight camp experience ever. (Thank goodness it’s only a five-day session, as I’m feeling very nervous and sad about leaving my firstborn, even though I am confident she’ll have a great time and be in good hands.)

Are More Rabbis Saying ‘I Do’ To Interfaith Weddings?

09/29/2010
Associate Editor

 Eight years ago, like all Reform rabbinical students about to be ordained, Rachel Goldenberg had to make a decision. Would she officiate at interfaith weddings or not?

Along with many of her classmates at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, Goldenberg opted against performing such ceremonies, reasoning that the ritual made sense only when joining two Jews.

But a few months ago, Rabbi Goldenberg, the spiritual leader of Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek in Chester, Conn., changed her mind.

Are More Rabbis Saying ‘I Do’ To Interfaith Weddings?

09/29/2010
Associate Editor

Eight years ago, like all Reform rabbinical students about to be ordained, Rachel Goldenberg had to make a decision. Would she officiate at interfaith weddings or not?

Along with many of her classmates at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, Goldenberg opted against performing such ceremonies, reasoning that the ritual made sense only when joining two Jews.

But a few months ago, Rabbi Goldenberg, the spiritual leader of Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek in Chester, Conn., changed her mind.

Julie Wiener

Jewish Weddings on Shabbat: A Different View

08/27/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

My friend and colleague Rabbi Leon Morris has made a provocative call for a moratorium on weddings performed before the end of Shabbat on Saturday evening. He argues that such weddings undermine the sanctity of Shabbat and send the wrong message about the demands of Jewish commitment.

A Call For A Moratorium On Shabbat Weddings

08/24/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The recent wedding of Chelsea Clinton and Marc Mezvinsky has triggered a spate of articles about interfaith marriage, rabbinic officiation, co-officiation with Christian clergy and the like. Considerably less attention has been focused on the fact that the wedding took place on a Saturday before nightfall. Perhaps this was deemed less newsworthy because it has become so commonplace. I’m asking myself whether the most publicized Shabbat wedding in American Jewish history might have the unintended consequence of questioning anew the propriety of performing weddings on the Sabbath.

Will Chelsea Clinton - Marc Mezvinsky Union Weaken Co-officiation Taboo?

Strong opposition to rabbi-minister weddings, but some cracks appearing.

08/04/2010
Associate Editor

 A ketubah behind them, the bride and groom stood under a chupah with a rabbi, listened to friends recite the Sheva Brachot — and at the end of the ceremony, the tallit-wearing groom stepped on a glass.

But Chelsea Clinton and Marc Mezvinsky’s long-awaited wedding Saturday night was not your average Jewish ceremony. 

That’s not just because the parents held aloft on chairs at the reception included a former U.S. president, the current U.S. secretary of state and two former members of Congress. 

Marc and Chelsea under the chupah: Intermarriage for the ages.
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