Vouchers

Is Voucher Opposition Eroding?

Jewish organizations increasingly willing to advocate for tax cuts and other government benefits that could benefit day schools.

05/01/2012
Assistant Managing Editor

As the weak economy puts a greater strain on Jewish day schools and the parents who support them, discussion about tapping public revenue to ease the burden is gaining new traction in the community, and some say this could be a landmark year for action on that front.

UJA-Federation recently hired Darcy Hirsh to advocate for more state resources for private schools.

Is Peter Beinart The New Steven M. Cohen?

Forgot those 50 rabbis Newsweek has been fussing over.

Journalist/author Peter Beinart may well be the most famous American Jew these days, at least among the New York Times-New York Review of Books-New Yorker-reading intelligentsia.

The Ravitch Switch: Searching for Answers to the Radical Transformation of Education Critic Diane Ravitch

Ever since her fierce polemic against the school reform movement, “The Death and Life of the Great American School System,” which came out last year, Diane Ravitch has become a ubiquitous voice in the raging education debate.  It is not only because her writing is so cogent and ostensibly fact-driven, but also because her striking transformation—from one-time school reform champion, to sudden critic—that she has turned many heads.

The Ravitch Switch: Searching for Answers to the Radical Transformation of Education Critic Diane Ravitch

Ever since her fierce polemic against the school reform movement, “The Death and Life of the Great American School System,” which came out last year, Diane Ravitch has become an ubiquitous voice in the raging education debate.  It is not only because her writing is so cogent and ostensibly fact-driven, but also because her striking transformation—from one-time school reform champion, to sudden critic—that she has turned many heads.

Andrew Cuomo: The Lost Interview

11/05/2010

In early September 2002, Andrew Cuomo, struggling to gain traction in a Democratic primary battle against state comptroller H. Carl McCall, visited The Jewish Week for an extensive interview. The interview was set to run alongside one with McCall when, on Sept. 3, Cuomo suddenly dropped out of the race, under pressure from fellow Democrats to avoid splitting the party and to present a united front against Republican George Pataki, who would defeat McCall to win a third term in office. As a result, the below interview was never published.

Vouchers Get a Boost

05/07/1999
Washington Correspondent

The debate over school vouchers is heating up around the country, and Jewish groups on both sides of the issue are jumping into the fray. But despite all the noise, most observers agree Jewish voters haven’t strayed too far from their traditional opposition to plans that provide indirect public support for private and parochial schools.
The impetus for the new push comes from Florida, where the state legislature passed a major voucher plan last week.

Supreme Court Opens Door to School Vouchers

This week’s decision by the Supreme Court not to hear a case involving a pioneering school voucher program in Milwaukee postponed a judicial showdown over theconstitutionality of government aid to parochial institutions.

11/13/1998
Washington Correspondent
Door Opened For Vouchers This week’s decision by the Supreme Court not to hear a case involving a pioneering school voucher program in Milwaukee postponed a judicial showdown over theconstitutionality of government aid to parochial institutions. But there was widespread agreement that the move may send a signal to cities and states considering similar programs, which provide tax vouchers to parents who send their children to private or parochial schools, and to lower courts that are beginning to rule on such programs.

A Vote for Vouchers

06/19/1998
Washington Correspondent
A Vote For Vouchers Last week’s Wisconsin Supreme Court decision upholding the use of government vouchers at parochial schools won’t change many opinions in a deeply divided Jewish community, but it may significantly change the political calculus for the issue. And the Wisconsin decision was written in a way that may work to the advantage of voucher supporters when the case goes before the Supreme Court. So far, opponents of the plan have not appealed, although they are expected to do so soon.
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