Terezin

Terezin Show Makes It To N.Y.

05/21/2013
Special To The Jewish Week

It was the show that wouldn’t die.

Karel Švenk’s “The Last Cyclist,” written and performed in the “model” concentration camp of Terezin, comes to the Upper West Side this weekend after a circuitous route to the New York stage.  The cabaret-style play, which is a farcical allegory of the genocide of the Jews, was banned by the Jewish Council in the camp, for fear of reprisals from the Nazis. Adapted by Naomi Patz, it has its New York premiere at the Church of St. Paul and St. Andrew after productions in St. Paul, Chicago, and other cities.

Naomi Patz adapted the wartime play, “The Last Cyclist,” which will be staged at the West End Theater.

The Y Pulls Together For Terezin

Interdisciplinary project probing the camp’s unique culture represents new approach for premier arts institution.

01/03/2012
Special to the Jewish Week

When the 92nd Street Y launches its ambitious five-week-long project, “Will to Create, Will to Live: The Culture of Terezin” on Jan. 9, it will mark a significant change in the way one of the city’s most esteemed arts institutions does its work. For the first time in its history, the Y’s Tisch Center for the Arts is drawing on nearly all of the resources of 92Y's many departments to present an interdisciplinary series of programs that will include concerts, lectures, readings, classes, film screenings and dance performances.

A poster advertising a performance of Hans Krasa’s children’s opera “Brundibar.”

Claude Lanzmann, Briefly

Rare screening of three of the ‘Shoah’ director’s more recent short films at Film Comment Select series.

02/22/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

In the death camp at Treblinka there was a fake railroad station that included a clock on which the painted hands always read 6 o’clock. The entire construction was a grotesque joke perpetrated by the camp’s commandant Fritz Stangl; in Treblinka, time stood still because all those brought there were dead from the moment they entered.

A scene from Lanzmann's "Sobibor."

The Final Show At Terezin

The concentration camp's chorus, whose Requiem will be performed at Kennedy Center, sang out their sorrows.

09/28/2010
Staff Writer

As a Nazi prisoner in the Terezin concentration camp, Edgar Krasa said he and other Jewish prisoners were forced to work all day and to survive on little food. What kept him and others going was the camp’s secret chorus.

“After work we went to a basement where we were encouraged to sing Czech songs we all knew,” recalled Krasa, who lives in the Boston suburb of Newton Center. “This was spiritually uplifting. And for those who [later] heard us sing in concerts, it reminded them of the life they had lived.

Terezin survivor Marianka Zadikow, who sang Verdi’s Requiem at Terezin.

The Majesty Of Prague, The Spirit Of Terezin

06/12/2009
Editor and Publisher
 Prague, Czech Republic — On a recent visit here, my wife and I toured several famous synagogues, remarkable for their long history, beautiful architecture and vast size, part of the reason why for tourists, the Jewish sites of this charming city — most notably the centuries-old cemetery in the center of town — are second only in popularity to the ancient royal castle that dominates the skyline.    
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