technology

iPad Provides Voice for Bar Mitzvah Boy

One of the great uses of the Apple iPad is for children with disabilities. Steve Jobs was acutely aware of that important use of the tablet that was one of the gadgets of which he was most proud. 

A recent article in the Boston Globe demonstrates just how helpful the iPad is for children with disabilities. Steven A. Rosenberg writes about Matthew Emmi, a bar mitzvah boy who is severely autistic.

Michael and Suzanne Emmi used an iPad to help their autistic son Matthewat… (ESSDRASMSUAREZ/GLOBE STAFF)

What Are the Top Jewish Apps?

The Orthodox Union (OU) has just released a new mobile app that will be helpful for those seeking knowledge on what food products are kosher for Passover. The new app allows the user to enter any food item or product to gather all of the kosher information including if the certification is up to date.

I would certainly add this helpful utility app to the listing of the best Jewish apps that I recently published here on The Jewish Week website and in a special "Looking Ahead Looking Back" supplement. Here is the article:

The OU launches new kosher app in time for Passover preparations and the 2011's best mobile apps

Jewish Non-Profits and Social Media - Do They Get It?

Cross-posted to Blog.RabbiJason.com

As a rabbi who is a social mediaologist, I find myself consulting a lot of synagogues and Jewish nonprofits on their social media strategy. The leaders of these institutions all recognize that they require a social media strategy, but the plan for how it will be implemented varies greatly.

Are Jewish Non-Profits adding social media to their arsenal of marketing tools?

Kids And Kindles

12/20/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

At a recent program at the San Francisco Jewish Community Center on the new digital landscape, a rabbi and three prominent writers debated whether our current “Digital Overload” — as the panel was titled — is leading to a more interesting cultural environment for our children, or whether we are going down a rabbit hole of apocalyptic distraction. Unsurprisingly, no answer was declared. But the conversation was notable for several reasons.

Daniel Schifrin

Israeli Archaeologists Use Facebook to Solve 3,000-Year-Old Mystery

With a planned IPO in 2012 the list of things that people are using Facebook for is only expanding. In Israel, archaeologists are using a Facebook Page to help them solve a 3,000-year-old mystery. The story was originally reported in The Washington Post​ and Mark Weiss explains how Facebook is coming in handy for these archaeologists. He reports from Jerusalem for ​The Irish Times:

Facebook is helping archaeologists in Israel

QR Codes in Jewish Education

I'm often asked what I think will be the "next big thing" when it comes to technology and Jewish education. Recently, I've been focused on QR codes. You know those odd little squares that look like a cross between a thumbprint and a bar code? Scanning that QR code automatically provides you with information about whatever it was that you just scanned. A lot of information. Scan a book and immediately be able to search inside its pages or find the lowest price online to purchase it.

How will QR codes be the next big thing in Jewish education?

The iPad Wedding

I've written on this blog about Jewish weddings and other Jewish life cycle events that have welcomed Skype technology. The newest way to bring loved ones from far way into the simcha is through an iPad or other tablet device. 

Rabbi Rachel Kobrin watched the grandfather of the bride deliver a wedding speech via iPad

High-Tech Competition In White Plains

11/08/2011
Staff Writer

The students of the Solomon Schechter School of Westchester typically excel in such intellectual areas as chess, Moot Beit Din (a program in which students adjudicate legal cases using Jewish texts) and the National Merit competition. This week the school went high-tech, conducting its first Robotic Competition. Under the leadership of teacher Daniel Aviv, teams of students in the Westchester School designed and built small robots that can perform a specific task. The creations can move and turn — but they have not yet learned to play chess or argue a legal case.

Photograph By Michael Datikash

FaceGlat May Be a More Modest Facebook But It's Not Hacker-Proof

FaceGlat, the ultra-Orthodox social networking site, is an attempt to offer Haredi Jews the experience of Facebook without all the immodesty. From the opening page it reminds one of public restrooms with a sign for men to enter through one door and women to enter through their own door. FaceGlat's name is a mashup of Facebook and glatt, the term for kosher meat considered to be a higher standard of kosher because of the source animal's smooth lungs.

The ultra-Orthodox version of Facebook gets hacked by Palestinian hackers from Jordan for the second time.
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