Sukkot

Sukkah City, The Movie

Filmmaker behind "Orthodox Stance" captures Reboot's 2010 public art project

10/10/2012
Staff Writer

For a ritual structure intended to evoke fragility and transience, the sukkah enjoys an oddly long life as an object of contemplation and representation.

Two years ago, it was Sukkah City, an architecture competition and public art project in Union Square. It drew an estimated 200,000 viewers to the dozen winning, legally valid but visually untraditional temporary booths built to celebrate the holiday of Sukkot, which ended earlier this week.

The winners of the Sukkah City competition had to honor Jewish law. Photo courtesy sukkahcity.com

If You Build It, It May Fall

Every sukkah has a story. Some guys remember fondly every car they’ve owned. I can get misty about every sukkah in my life.

10/03/2012
Editor And Publisher

When it comes to hardware stores, you can count me as a One-Day-A-Year Jew — and that day occurs just before the holiday of Sukkot, when I focus on putting up our family sukkah in the backyard. Thank God it only has to stand for eight days.

Part of the wonderful rhythm of the High Holy Days season is that we go directly from the cerebral solemnity of Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur to the hands-on, harvest-inspired, outdoor-focused festival of Sukkot, recalling the wanderings of the ancient Israelites in the desert those 40 long years.


Gary Rosenblatt

Four Species OK For Air Travel, Says TSA

09/28/2012

Plants used for Sukkot can be carried on an airplane, the Transportation Security Administration said.

The TSA, which is a part of the U.S. Homeland Security Department, said it will allow palm branches, myrtle twigs, willow twigs and citrons in airports, through security checkpoints and on airplanes. The items and the people carrying them must go through security screenings; the items are not on any prohibited list.

Sukkot In Israel: Hut 1, Hut 2, Hut 3, Hut …

09/25/2012
Staff Writer

In Israel, you don’t have to look at a calendar to know that Sukkot is approaching.

You just have to look around.

In the Jewish state, the Jewish festival of booths — the literal meaning of Sukkot — makes its presence felt in every street, in every courtyard, in every field, on every rooftop. In every empty space that is open to the sky.

Photo By Getty Images

What My Father Learned From Mordecai Kaplan

05/08/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Back in the 1950’s, Orthodoxy was descendant with many predicting its demise.

Where Occupy Wall Street Meets Sukkot

10/12/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

“When a person eats and drinks in celebration of a festival, he is obligated to feed converts, orphans, widows, and others who are destitute and poor. In contrast, a person who locks the gates of his courtyard and eats and drinks with his children and his wife, without feeding the poor and the embittered, is not indulging in rejoicing associated with a mitzvah, but rather the rejoicing of his gut … This rejoicing is a disgrace…” 

Rabbi Marci N. Bellows

There Are No Silly Questions

10/12/2011
Jewish Week Online Columnist

 

Over the years, I’ve had what must be tens of thousands of conversations with congregants, and strangers that I’ve met in the context of my work.  I couldn’t begin to count the number of times those conversations began with the words “Rabbi, can I ask you a silly question?” 

The good teacher — or should I say the wise teacher -— will tell you that there are no silly questions.  There are silly answers, to be sure, but very few if any silly questions.

Rabbi Gerald Skolnik

The Odd Economics Of Sukkot

10/11/2011
Editorial

Sukkot is a holiday beloved for its sense of openness and beauty, to be able to sit within and yet feel a part of all outdoors, seeing the moon through the roof, feeling the weather through the walls.

And yet, Sukkot has somehow developed into a holiday whose economics are the least transparent of any holy day of the year.

‘A Lulav And Etrog Shuk’

10/11/2011
Staff Writer

One of New York City’s busiest — and briefest — shopping centers made its annual appearance this week.

Between Sunday, the day after Yom Kippur, and Wednesday, erev Sukkot, a stretch of several blocks along the south side of Main Street in Queens’ heavily Jewish Kew Gardens Hills neighborhood, became a pre-holiday bazaar. At wooden tables set up along the street, Sukkot supplies went on sale.

Available were Four Species sets and materials for family sukkahs. And, in once-a-year storefronts, ready-to-assemble sukkahs themselves.

Photo By Michael Datikash

Why No One Will Read This Blog

Don’t you have anything more important to do today, on the eve of the last days of the long Sukkot holiday -- at the end of a month of two-and-a-half day work weeks -- than read blogs?

Don’t get me wrong, I’m happy to have you here, just a little surprised, that’s all. I wasn’t really expecting anyone. Thought I would just vent in private about how tough this month has been in terms of keeping up with work responsibilities.

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