Poland

Wanna Buy A Historic Shul In Poland?

Since 2002, Jewish communal reclamation in Poland has reaped millions of dollars. Critics complain of a lack of financial transparency.

03/02/2011
Staff Writer
Story Includes Video: 
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As Menachem Daum walked through the streets of Dzialoszyce, Poland, in 2002, he saw the roofless synagogue built in 1854, a poignant reminder of the vibrant Jewish community that had once existed there. On a return trip he made three years later, Daum was approached by a man who seemed to be in charge.

“How much do you want to pay me for it?” he asked Daum.

The shell of a synagogue in Dzialoszyce, Poland.  Courtesy of Menachem Daum

Helen Thomas: Jews Were Not Persecuted in Europe After War, Should Have Stayed There

02/18/2011

(JTA) – Former White House correspondent Helen Thomas said the Jews did not have to leave postwar Europe because they weren’t persecuted.

In an interview Wednesday on CNN’s “Joy Behar” program, Thomas told Behar that once World War II ended, the Jews “didn’t have to go anywhere really, because they weren’t being persecuted anymore. But they were taking other people’s land.”

Timothy Snyder on "Shoah": Lanzmann's Triumph, and Tragedy

Last summer the Yale historian Timothy Snyder drew much attention with his provocative essay detailing the ways Auschwitz is a poor symbol of the Holocaust: Jews died mainly by bullets, not by the gas chambers typified in Auschwitz. And while most Jews sent to Auschwitz were from Western Europe, the majority of those murdered came from the East.

Timothy Snyder on "Shoah": Lanzmann's Triumph, and Tragedy

Last summer the Yale historian Timothy Snyder drew much attention with his provocative essay detailing the ways Auschwitz is a poor symbol of the Holocaust: Jews died mainly by bullets, not by the gas chambers typified in Auschwtiz. And most Jews sent to Auschwitz were from Western Europe, yet most those murdered came from the East.

Timothy Synder on "Shoah": Lanzmann's Triumph, and Tragedy

Last summer the Yale historian Timothy Snyder drew much attention with his provocative essay detailing the ways Auschwitz is a poor symbol of the Holocaust: Jews died mainly by bullets, not by the gas chambers typified in Auschwtiz. And most Jews sent to Auschwitz were from Western Europe, yet most those murdered came from the East.

Three Charged in Auschwitz Sign Theft

11/26/2010

(JTA) -- Polish prosecutors charged a Swedish man and two Polish men in the theft of the "Arbeit Macht Frei” sign from the front gate of Auschwitz.

The Swede, Anders Hogstrom, a neo-Nazi leader who allegedly organized the theft as a middleman between a neo-Nazi buyer and five Polish thieves, reportedly struck a plea bargain with Polish prosecutors on Thursday. Under the terms of the deal, Hogstrum will serve 32 months in jail in his native Sweden, the French news service AFP reported Thursday.

Film Of Cantors’ Poland Trip Goes Flat

‘100 Voices: A Journey Home’ offers little historical context.

09/16/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

I feel utterly certain that the new documentary “100 Voices: A Journey Home” is the most exasperating film I will see in 2010. The film, which documents the concert tour of a hundred members of the Cantorial Assembly to Poland, dashes all over the place, offering quick histories of the American cantorate, the Krakow Jewish Culture Festival, the Yiddish theater, and the personal stories of several cantors and musicians whose families survived the Shoah.

“100 Voices: A Journey Home”

Aleksander Kwaśniewski, former president of Poland

Kwasniewski discusses religion and politics in Poland, Polish-Jewish relations today and the Holocaust with Jacques Berlinerblau, director of the Program for Jewish Civilization at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.

Polish Gov’t: Auschwitz Crosses To Be Removed

In a unexpected development, the bitter confrontation between Jewish groups and the Polish government over Christian symbols at the Auschwitz death camp moved a few steps closer to resolution this week with a letter from Prime Minister Jerzy Buzek outlini

12/04/1998
Washington Correspondent
Washington — In a unexpected development, the bitter confrontation between Jewish groups and the Polish government over Christian symbols at the Auschwitz death camp moved a few steps closer to resolution this week with a letter from Prime Minister Jerzy Buzek outlining the steps his government is prepared to take to end the conflict. In the letter, Buzek pledged that his government will “remove all new crosses” as soon as possible.
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