Passover

Crunch Time At Matzah Bakery

04/12/2011

At shmura matzah bakeries, where the “guarded” unleavened kosher-for-Passover product is made, thoughts of the seders start around Chanukah.

By November, the wheat harvested in June — under supervision, to ensure that it does not come into contact with water and possibly become chametz — and ground into flour soon afterwards, is kneaded with water and baked.

Photos By Michael Datikash

Let My People… Sing Satires

Passover Soundtrack

04/12/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

Why is this Passover different from all other Passovers? Maybe it’s all those Jewish boys-turned-rappers showing up on YouTube, dressed in matching attire, grinning incessantly, singing Pesach lyrics to the tune of hip, popular songs.

Boy bands battle it out on YouTube: Members of Kol Ish, top, and Six13, above.

The Spiritual Essence Of Matzah And Chahametz

04/12/2011

Shabbat Shalom
Candlelighting, Readings:
Candles: 7:17 p.m. (Friday); 7:20 p.m. (Monday);
8:22 p.m. (Tuesday)
Torah: Lev. 16:1 – 18:30 (Saturday); Ex. 7:21-51
(Tuesday); Lev. 22:26-23:44 (Wednesday);
Num. 28:16-25 (Tuesday & Wednesday)
Haftarah: Malachi 3:4-24 (Saturday);
Joshua 5:2-6:1 & 6:27 (Tuesday);  II Kings 23:1-9;
21-25 (Wednesday)
Havdalah: 8:18 p.m. (Saturday);
8:23 p.m. (Wednesday)

Siblings And The Seder, Then And Now

04/12/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

When I think about the Passover seders of my childhood, I remember the giddy preparations: setting the table with my grandmother’s tablecloth and dishes, rolling the matzah balls and making place cards for each of the guests.

Talia R. Cohen

The Fifth Question

04/11/2011
JInsider

Most people are familiar with the four questions of Passover (especially all those youngest siblings out there), but while we Ma Nishtanah the same way every year, the important questions facing Jews are constantly evolving. To keep up with the changing times, for this column we asked: What would be a good Fifth Question to make this year’s Passover different than all others?

Happy Passover from jinsider.com

Seder Guests and the Dysfunctional Family

04/07/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

Q - "I heard from an observant friend that it is inappropriate to invite non Jews to a Seder; but doesn't it also say in the Haggadah, "Let those who are hungry come and eat?" So am I supposed to invite only Jewish homeless and hungry people? Plus, given my strained family dynamics, I think it would be best not to invite any guests at all. What's the ethical thing to do?

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman

Enslavement, Redemption, and the Arab World: A Passover Unlike All Others

04/07/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

Each and every year, at precisely this time of year, I find myself struggling with the question of who owns Jewish history.

It sounds like an odd question, I know. In a sense, it is. But what I mean is that there are some chapters of our history that are so imprinted on the broader consciousness of western civilization that it often feels as if we have handed over our historical experience to the rest of the world, to use as it pleases.

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik

More On Cokie & Steve's Haggadah

In the new edition of The Jewish Week, I have a short Q&A with Cokie and Steve Roberts, authors of the bestselling “Our Haggadah: Uniting Traditions for Interfaith Families.” (Although it should be noted that since I put that article to bed, “The 30-Minute Seder” has bumped Cokie and Steve from the No. 1 position on Amazon.com.)

I was a bit nervous interviewing two prominent journalists, but both of them were quite gracious interviewees, and, other than the book’s two Jesus and Pope John Paul II quotes, which, I admit, made me a little squeamish, it is a pretty good Haggadah. I especially like how friendly and down-to-earth it is, how accessible it makes the holiday, and how emphatic it is in stating that it is not trying to “Christianize” Passover.

Seder Shopping On the Upper East Side

04/05/2011
Staff Writer

It’s easy to predict which seder items — from tables full of toys, crafts and books — will attract children.

“Kids love the frogs best,” says Marga Hirsch, coordinator of the annual Haggadah Fair at Park Avenue Synagogue that runs until the Friday before Passover. “Little kids love the inflatable frogs.”

Students browse Passover books at Park Avenue Synagogue

Why Is This Restaurant Different?

Few kosher eateries jump through the necessary hoops to open for Passover,
but those who do are rewarded with good PR and new customers.

04/05/2011
Editorial Assistant

What’s a hamburger without its bun? Well it’s what’s on the menu at kosher restaurants across New York City, as they scrub down their kitchens and revamp their menus for the Passover holiday.

While most kosher eateries shut their doors for the week, a handful of restaurants will brave the trials and tribulations of opening for Passover.

“I find it one of the easiest holidays to cook for,” said Jeff Nathan, owner and chef at Abigael’s restaurant in Midtown, which will be open for Passover this year.

Chef Jeff Nathan finds Passover “one of the easiest holidays to cook for” at his Midtown restaurant, Abigael’s.
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