Passover

Blogger's Clearing House Sweepstakes

For reasons I shall explain later, I won't be blogging much this week.

But that's OK, because I have suggestions of ways you can keep yourself busy and maybe even make some extra cash in my absence. In fact, you DEAR READER OF IN THE MIX may already be a winner.

Freedom Seder?

‘The Whipping Man,’ with Passover at its center, revisits the horror of slavery in the South.

02/01/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

With its overarching message of freedom and redemption, Passover seems better suited to America than any other Jewish holiday. And one of the most striking aspects of Passover in this country is the appeal that it has for non-Jews, especially African-Americans

Jay Wilkison, André Braugher and André Holland in Matthew Lopez’s “The Whipping Man.”

Quinoa with Raisins and Toasted Pine Nuts

A tasty and nutritious side dish to any meal.

12/23/2010
Editorial Assistant

Quinoa is known in many Ashkenazic Jewish households for one reason: Pesach. The healthy, sort-of-grain plant is actually a seed, and it is neither chametz (leavened) nor kitniyot (grains and legumes – including rice, peas and beans), meaning they can be used on the food-challenged holiday (according to most rabbis).

Quinoa with Raisins and Toasted Pine Nuts, Photo by Amy Spiro

Video Haggadahs

There are thousands of Passover Haggadahs that have been published throughout the world. And with the increasing popularity of the Internet, new forms of haggadot are being created each year.

This year's Passover, which concluded a few short days ago, saw the return of the Facebook Haggadah as well as some attempts at using Twitter to create a Passover Tweder.

Around the Cyber Seder

As we approach the Passover Seder, here are a few cool sites and videos to enhance the Passover experience:

Bangitout.com - Seder Sidekick 2010

Isaac and Seth Galena, the brothers behind the popular Jewish humor site Bangitout.com have once again published a Seder Sidekick to help bring some levity to the Passover Seder. Dedicated to the memory of Dr. Harold Galena, the 38-page PDF document includes song parodies, top ten lists, silly jokes, quizzes, and funny pictures.

The Facebook Haggadah 2.0

After the success of his 2009 Facebook Haggadah, I predicted that Carl Elkin would say "Next Year on Twitter." Apparently, that prediction didn't come to be.

Is Facebook Chametz?

Crossposted to Blog.RabbiJason

Is Facebook kosher? If so, is it kosher for Passover? I'm not posing the question of whether it is acceptable to log on to Facebook on the first and last days of Passover, when observant Jews refrain from using computers or the Web.  Rather, is Facebook activity allowed at all during the Jewish Spring festival?

 Rabbi Shir Yaakov Feinstein-Feit

Buyers Beware

04/08/2003
Staff Writer
The city's Department of Consumer Affairs is calling on the public to report instances of suspected price gouging while shopping for Passover goods. "We will be ready to respond to any complaints we receive about vendors who may be taking advantage of the holiday," DCA Commissioner Gretchen Dykstra announced Sunday. Shoppers who feel that prices have been inflated at a particular venue may call the cityís new citizen service hotline at 311. DCA inspectors will investigate through April 24, the last day of Passover.

A Fiery Exodus

04/21/2006
Associate Editor

The night before Passover, the Waintraub family checked into the Villa Roma hotel and, with candlelight and a feather, symbolically searched their darkened room for chametz. But not all flames in the hotel were as quaint.

Even as the Waintraubs were searching, shortly after 10 p.m., over in the bakery within the hotel kitchen a fire of unknown origins had begun devouring the 62-year-old resort, one of Sullivan Countyís few remaining grand hotels, where some 500 guests were expected to arrive by the next nightís seder.

The Pricing Pulse

03/25/1999
Staff Writer
Sometime during the late 1980s, my family’s Passover seder table found itself embroiled in revolution. The cause of revolution had arrived one seder night disguised as an innocent gift from my uncle. This uncle bore a bottle of wine that, upon closer inspection, became an object of considerable suspicion. This bottle of wine, marked kosher yet bright pink, simply did not look Jewish.
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