Passover

Preparing for Passover: Keeping Perspective Amidst the Madness

04/14/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

It is often said that if it were possible to remember pain, no family would have more than one child. And yet, year in and year out, we Jews engage in this annual ritual of completely subverting the normal order of our kitchens, and often our furniture, and willingly subject ourselves to the very arduous task of preparing for Passover.

By the way, it is also often said that if the ancient rabbis ever set foot in their kitchens, such that they were, the laws of Passover would look quite different. But we won't go there…

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik

A Different (Second) Night

How do you make the second seder distinctive? Readers offer a variety of suggestions.

Staff Writer
04/13/2011

You sit down at the seder table, start the holiday meal with Kiddush, then déjà vu hits you: didn’t we do this last night?

For many people, the second seder — Yom Tov Sheni Shel Galiuot, which takes place only in the diaspora — is a challenge. Going through the same readings and rituals seems repetitive. Those who already asked “why is this night different from all other nights?” strain to make the second seder different from the first.

passover_second_seder.gif

A Warsaw Ghetto Passover

‘I never missed a seder,’ says survivor who risked his life to join family at a seder in the doomed Jewish quarter.

Staff Writer
04/13/2011

Near the start of the seders I conduct, mostly in former communist countries, I usually cite, then refute, the statement by Ahad Ha’am, the early Zionist leader, that “More than Israel has kept the Sabbath, the Sabbath has kept Israel.”

The seder, I say, has preserved the Jewish people; most are not shomer Shabbat; most go to a seder, even it involves a sacrifice.

That’s not bull. It’s Bull.

Irving Milchberg, spent a memorable seder in the burning ruins in 1943. Ontario Jewish Archives

Parceling Out The Passover Story

Niche publishing comes to the Haggadah.

Staff Writer
04/13/2011

In a trend that has been growing in recent decades, the publishing industry – which has brought printing into everyone’s hands and allowed publishers to gear their products to particular segments of the market – now offers Haggadahs and related Pesach books that appeal on the whole, to specific parts of the Jewish community.

The Szyk Haggadah. (Abrams, 128 pages, $16.95)

Crunch Time At Matzah Bakery

04/12/2011

At shmura matzah bakeries, where the “guarded” unleavened kosher-for-Passover product is made, thoughts of the seders start around Chanukah.

By November, the wheat harvested in June — under supervision, to ensure that it does not come into contact with water and possibly become chametz — and ground into flour soon afterwards, is kneaded with water and baked.

Photos By Michael Datikash

Let My People… Sing Satires

Passover Soundtrack

04/12/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

Why is this Passover different from all other Passovers? Maybe it’s all those Jewish boys-turned-rappers showing up on YouTube, dressed in matching attire, grinning incessantly, singing Pesach lyrics to the tune of hip, popular songs.

Boy bands battle it out on YouTube: Members of Kol Ish, top, and Six13, above.

The Spiritual Essence Of Matzah And Chahametz

04/12/2011

Shabbat Shalom
Candlelighting, Readings:
Candles: 7:17 p.m. (Friday); 7:20 p.m. (Monday);
8:22 p.m. (Tuesday)
Torah: Lev. 16:1 – 18:30 (Saturday); Ex. 7:21-51
(Tuesday); Lev. 22:26-23:44 (Wednesday);
Num. 28:16-25 (Tuesday & Wednesday)
Haftarah: Malachi 3:4-24 (Saturday);
Joshua 5:2-6:1 & 6:27 (Tuesday);  II Kings 23:1-9;
21-25 (Wednesday)
Havdalah: 8:18 p.m. (Saturday);
8:23 p.m. (Wednesday)

Siblings And The Seder, Then And Now

04/12/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

When I think about the Passover seders of my childhood, I remember the giddy preparations: setting the table with my grandmother’s tablecloth and dishes, rolling the matzah balls and making place cards for each of the guests.

Talia R. Cohen

The Fifth Question

04/11/2011
JInsider

Most people are familiar with the four questions of Passover (especially all those youngest siblings out there), but while we Ma Nishtanah the same way every year, the important questions facing Jews are constantly evolving. To keep up with the changing times, for this column we asked: What would be a good Fifth Question to make this year’s Passover different than all others?

Happy Passover from jinsider.com

Seder Guests and the Dysfunctional Family

04/07/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

Q - "I heard from an observant friend that it is inappropriate to invite non Jews to a Seder; but doesn't it also say in the Haggadah, "Let those who are hungry come and eat?" So am I supposed to invite only Jewish homeless and hungry people? Plus, given my strained family dynamics, I think it would be best not to invite any guests at all. What's the ethical thing to do?

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman
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