Passover

One Arab-Israeli Man Buys All The Government’s Chametz Each Year

04/07/2015

Ever wonder how the Israeli government gets rid of its chametz, or leavened foods, at Passover?

By The Rivers Of Babylon

Passover, an ancient cuneiform tablet and the idea of exile.

04/02/2015
Special To The Jewish Week

For weeks, I’ve been going about the usual get-rid-of-leavening-and-remove-sticky-gunk-from-telephone  Passover preparations.  I tossed out dried apricots that had fossilized in my cabinet, pulled old tissues out of coat pockets and discovered (woo-hoo!) a few crumpled dollar bills, and made a lengthy grocery list ranging from boxes of matzah meal to more dried apricots to purchase for my seder dinners.

A cuneiform tablet like this one is part of Bible Lands Museum show in Jerusalem. Wikimedia Commons

See One Person, Be One Person

04/02/2015
Special To The Jewish Week

Holocaust educators know that some numbers are almost impossible to comprehend: six million Jews; 11 million people; 1.5 million children, 1.1 of them Jewish. But if you tell me one person’s story, then I can begin to understand.

Rabbi Debra Orenstein

All Are Welcome At The Seder

In your mind’s eye, look around at those with whom you have celebrated past Seders. 

A contemplative girl is full of questions: How could a respected family in Egypt so quickly become an enslaved nation? Why was Pharaoh so stubborn?

There’s the "Squirmer." If he doesn’t declare outright that he’d rather not be at the Seder, his body language clearly broadcasts the message.

Seated next to each other are two frustrated guests. One is always losing his place in the Haggadah, and the other’s eyes often stray to the kitchen.

During its recounting of the Exodus from Egypt, the Haggadah “pauses” to consider Seder participants resembling those described above. They are portrayed as four sons: one wise, one wicked, one simple and one who doesn’t know how to ask. 

Rabbi Michael Levy

‘Next Year In Jerusalem’

It is that Holy City, and its fate — next year and going forward — that weigh so heavily on our minds this Passover.

04/01/2015
Editor and Publisher

Delve into the Haggadah and you understand why there are more editions and variations of it than any other Jewish text. Its story is timeless, its themes are eternal, its message is as current as the day’s headlines.

Gary Rosenblatt

Burn Notice

03/31/2015
Staff Writer

A Erev Passover in Israel is not a good time for anyone with respiratory problems.

Everywhere you go, smoke gets in your lungs. And in your eyes. And all over you.

Getty Images

Telling The Story Of Freedom

03/31/2015
Special To The Jewish Week

The Passover table is a place of joy. It takes a lot of work to get there. And when the table is set with ritual food and tableware, it seems like an excellent platform for a great story and conversation to unfold. We’re all ready. We’re equipped with texts that share the majesty and miracles of our ancient days. We powered our way to freedom as an underdog against a large and tyrannical force that sought to destroy us. We know the plot lines all too well. It’s not hard to say, “In every generation a person is obligated to tell the story of the exodus from Egypt…” It seems that sadly and happily, it is always a relevant theme, either for our people or for someone else under the hand of oppression, on the brink of liberation.

Erica Brown

Matzah Ball Soup Success In 10 Tips

Secret ingredients for the dumplings: baking powder and whipped egg whites. Shhhh …

03/30/2015
Jewish Week Online Columnist

It isn’t Passover without matzah ball soup (and Bubbe nagging you why you aren’t married yet, and your little cousin sneaking too much Manischewitz). But mostly, it’s about the soup. You can argue how to spell it (matzah, matzoh, matzo, matza), but everyone agrees Jewish penicillin has a special place on the Seder table.

Amy Kritzer/JW

The Four Children, Without Judgement, In The New Gateways Haggadah

Rachel was, by turns, enthusiastic, grumpy, silly, listless, sunny and full of pre-teen attitude. As the result of her childhood stroke, she used a bright pink wheelchair to get around, and she communicated through hand gestures, vocalizations, facial expressions and a communication device called a Dynavox (also pink). Rachel’s love of Judaism was unmistakable, but her parents told us they had always hated the Four Children in the Hagaddah.

If Elijah Arrived In A Wheelchair, Could You Welcome Him To Your Seder?

If Elijah had a disability would he be welcomed at your Seder? During Passover we traditionally have a cup of wine at our Seder table for Elijah and we open the door to let him in. Could he get into your home or the place in which you celebrate the Passover holiday? If Elijah used a wheelchair or had other ambulation challenges could he get in?  Would you invite him in if he looked different or sounded unusual when he spoke? Could he participate in the rituals of Passover if he could not read the Haggadah? (For people who do not read or read well there is now an adapted Haggadah.)

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