NPR

A Mea Culpa From The Media

As Israel’s offensive in Gaza gathers momentum, many in the Jewish community have noticed international coverage of suffering in the strip.

They have accordingly seized the opportunity to again protest the media’s neglect of Sderot and other southern Isareli communities that bear the burden of daily bombardment.

Palestinians search the debris of the al-Dallu family home after an Israeli airstrike on Nov. 18. Getty Images

A Steve Reich Reader

This week I wrote about the minimalist composer Steve Reich, whose groundbreaking Jewish chorale piece "Tehillim" (1981) is being performed by the teenage new music ensemble Face the Music next Thursday at Le Poisson Rouge. (They'll perform "Tehillim" at other locations over the next few months as well.)

Fox News Chief Apologizes for Nazi Remark

11/19/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Fox News chief Roger Ailes apologized to the Anti-Defamation League for calling National Public Radio executives "Nazis."

Fox News Chief: NPR Bosses are Nazis

11/18/2010

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Roger Ailes, the Fox News Channel chief, called National Public Radio executives "Nazis" and said "left-wing rabbis" make it difficult to use the term "Holocaust" on air.

Ailes made the comments in an interview with the Daily Beast's Howard Kurtz, who was canvassing recent controversies about the right-leaning news channel. Ailes hired Juan Williams, a commentator, full time after NPR fired Williams for saying on a Fox News report that he feared seeing Muslims on airplanes.

Exit polls point to dramatic conservative surge

Looking at some of the early exit polls, there's a fascinating one by NPR.

According to the public radio folks, 41 percent of today's voters labeled themselves “conservative.”

Why is that important? It's up from 34 percent in 2008, 32 percent in 2006. That's a pretty dramatic shift, and points to how the final tallies are likely to go tonight.

It will be very interesting to see if we get some Jewish numbers on that question

NPR's gift to its enemies

I haven't blogged about NPR's clumsy firing of commentator Juan Williams for saying he gets nervous when boarding an airplane when there are Muslims in line with him, mostly because I'm not exactly sure I think about the issue.

Sure, it's scapegoating and bigotry and inappropriate. Sure, I've felt the same way sometimes. It's hard to sort out.

What is clear: NPR's leadership didn't think through the consequences of their actions in firing him, and in the process gave their conservative opponents the best possible gift.

Public Radio Days

05/09/2003
Associate Editor
National Public Radio has no trouble seeing right and wrong in dozens of other issues, but when it comes to Israel, NPR gave both Palestinian and Israeli historians ìan opportunity to explain how they see it differently.î For its series last fall on ìMorning Edition,î ìThe Mideast: A Century of Conflict,î researched and reported by veteran NPR News correspondent Mike Shuster, that approach earned the Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club.
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