New York Times

N.Y. Times' Ethan Bronner To Leave Jerusalem

02/14/2012

Ethan Bronner, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times, is stepping down from his position.

Bronner, who has been in Jerusalem for the past four years, has been named legal affairs reporter for the newspaper's national desk. Jodi Rudoren, the Times' education editor, will succeed Bronner in the Jerusalem post in April.

The newspaper's public editor had recommended two years ago that Bronner be reassigned because his son was serving in the Israel Defense Forces, which was seen as a conflict of interest by a pro-Palestinian website.

My Problem With David Brooks (and the odd company he keeps)

Like many liberals, David Brooks is a conservative I can like.  But every now and then he falls in with the wrong conservative crowd.  And this week it was in his swooning endorsement of Charles Murray and his new book, “Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010.”

Huh?, an Israeli "West Wing"?

With a name like “The Prime Minister’s Cabinet,” you’d think this television show was yet another British drama, a “Downton Abbey” sequel starring, say, Winston Churchill.  But it’s not—no, it has nothing to do with Brits, but with, of all things, Israelis.  Yes, in a culture story today, The New York Times devotes a full piece to an obscure Israeli political drama, made for T.V., that even critics in Isra

Eugenics Today: Or, Guess What Nazi Germany and North Carolina Share

A couple of months ago, I wrote a story about the excellent and horrifying exhibit “Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race,” now on view at the Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust.  It describes how Nazi Germany took the pseudo-science of eugenics—or “racial hygiene”; attempting to create a purer race through breeding, sterilization, and eventually murder—to its extreme. Jews would eventually suffer the brunt of these policies, from sterilization programs to outright death in gas chambers. But many Germans with simple disabilities like mental retardation or epilepsy had their share of racial cleansing too.

Bibi’s Missed Opportunity: An Op-Ed In The Times

12/27/2011
Special to The Jewish Week

Bibi Netanyahu proved last week beyond a doubt that he was an American Jew. How so? He boycotted the New York Times!

Some American Jews angry with the Times’ coverage of Israel have employed the boycott strategy for years. When they haven’t liked the slant of news and editorial coverage, they’ve cancelled their subscriptions to the Times. Rabbis have taken to the pulpit to urge their congregations to stop buying the paper (even as they preached sermons from its pages) and others have organized anti-Times campaigns on Facebook and petitions on the Internet.

Ari L. Goldman

"Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close": Adorno's Ghost and 9/11

It’s probably impossible to count the number of film reviews that attack kitschy takes on the Holocaust like this: “an impossible movie that has no reason for being other than as another pop-culture palliative for a trauma it can’t bear to face.” 

Or like this: “This is how kitsch works. It exploits familiar images, be they puppies or babies …and tries to make us feel good, even virtuous, simply about feeling.”

Times' Friedman Responds On `Israel Lobby' Phrase

12/20/2011
Editor and Publisher

New York Times columnist Tom Friedman told The Jewish Week Tuesday that the wording of a memorable phrase in his Dec. 13 column (“Newt, Mitt, Bibi and Vladimir”) may have been inexact when he wrote that the standing ovation Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu received in Congress this year “was bought and paid for by the Israel lobby.”

Doctor, Lawyers, Indian Chiefs -- And The Chief Rabbinate

I haven’t forgotten my pledge to respond to Dr. Jack Wertheimer’s op-ed. And, of course, I still remember my earlier promise to post more articles and resources about “December Dilemma” — which from now on I’m thinking of referring to as DD or D&D. Or maybe I could call it the Kislev Konundrum, although all those K’s start sounding a bit Teutonic.

The Military and Me: Or, How Jews Changed the Army and the Civil War

I recently started reading Eric Foner’s “The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery,” which won a Pulitzer this year.  It’s a subtle yet fast-moving narrative about Lincoln’s evolution from a man merely averse to slavery to the one who would abolish the institution forever in America. Slavery in America is inexhaustible topic for historians, but a subject harder to come by is Jews in America, at least before the late 19th century.

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