Netanyahu

Bibi Stages A Comeback

10/02/1998
Staff Writer
Benjamin Netanyahu is no longer on the hot seat in Mideast peace talks. He may not be in the driver’s seat, but it is clear after his five-day visit to the U.S. that the Israeli prime minister’s stock has gone up in Washington of late. Israeli officials assert that the Clinton administration is more sympathetic to Netanyahu’s insistence that the Palestinians must live up to their prior commitments on security before Israel agrees to a second redeployment in the West Bank.

The Three Amigos

10/02/1998
Editor and Publisher
The handsome, charismatic head of state has somehow maintained public support despite a series of incredible, seemingly fatal setbacks — from political scandals to being labeled a liar within his own party to well-publicized extra-marital affairs. He’s been counted out a dozen times in the last year alone, but he has survived and now even seems to be gaining ground. How does he manage to do it?It’s a question Benjamin Netanyahu and Bill Clinton could have asked of each other when they met at the White House this week.

Washington Nudging, Not Squeezing

The Clinton administration’s ire over the de facto freeze in implementation of the Wye River agreement — anger directed primarily at the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — was kept at a low simmer this week as officials here tried hard to e

01/15/1999
Washington Correspondent
Washington Nudging, Not Squeezing The Clinton administration’s ire over the de facto freeze in implementation of the Wye River agreement — anger directed primarily at the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — was kept at a low simmer this week as officials here tried hard to express their displeasure without getting entangled in the political melee taking place in Israel.

Clinton Facing Impeachment, Netanyahu Facing New Elections

With Washington and Jerusalem reeling from internal political crises, the Mideast peace process is likely to be the first casualty.

01/01/1999
Washington Correspondent
With Washington and Jerusalem reeling from internal political crises, the Mideast peace process is likely to be the first casualty. Neither President Clinton, facing an impeachment trial in the Senate, nor Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu, who was forced to call for new elections this week, appear to have the focus, or clout, to address the stymied Israeli-Palestinian negotiations.

Deconstructing The Summit

10/09/1998
Associate Editor

Annexation Anxiety

Last week’s move by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to expand the municipal jurisdiction of Jerusalem baffled and angered officials in Washington.

06/26/1998
Washington Correspondent
Annexation Anxiety

Netanyahu: Planning offensive in D.C. while spurning summit.

He won’t be here for the summit, but Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will be all but unavoidable in Washington this week on a quite different mission: taking his case to the American public for bucking President Clinton’s proposal

05/15/1998
Washington Correspondent


Washington — He won’t be here for the summit, but Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will be all but unavoidable in Washington this week on a quite different mission: taking his case to the American public for bucking President Clinton’s proposals to rekindle a gasping Israeli-Palestinian peace process.

Stage Set For A Collision: Lieberman, Netanyahu and Barack Obama

03/13/2009
Editor and Publisher
With the expected designation of Avigdor Lieberman as Israel’s next foreign minister in a narrow, right-wing coalition led by Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu, the stage seems set for a political collision course between Jerusalem and the rest of the world, including the U.S.

U.S. Gets Off Bibi’s Back

12/19/1997
Staff Writers
For Israel, the pressure has lifted — for now. After weeks of escalating criticism, the Clinton administration has suddenly taken a more benign tack in its dealings with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. But Secretary of State Madeleine Albright’s meetings with Netanyahu and with Palestinian Authority chief Yasir Arafat last week reset the clock for the two leaders to make some fateful decisions — decisions that so far they have studiously avoided.

‘Bullish Market In Expectations’

The Clinton administration got part of what it wanted in Monday’s landslide defeat of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the man they regard as most responsible for suffocating Mideast peace talks.

05/21/1999
Washington Correspondent
The Clinton administration got part of what it wanted in Monday’s landslide defeat of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the man they regard as most responsible for suffocating Mideast peace talks. But it will be weeks before they know if they got the rest — a quick jump-start to the stalled Israeli-Palestinian negotiations and a possible resumption of talks with Syria.
Syndicate content