NCJW

Jewish Groups Pan Voting Rights Ruling

06/25/2013
Staff Writer
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Several Jewish organizations this week condemned a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that in effect strikes down a provision in the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that has served as protection for otherwise disenfranchised voters for nearly a half-century.

Women Should Celebrate Suffrage By Voting

08/24/2011
Special To The Jewish Week Online

Women got the vote 91 years ago this week, but too many of us are still not exercising this most precious right. Single women, in particular, don’t vote in the same numbers as their married sisters, yet are in greater need of government policies and programs that will ensure them a brighter future. Indeed, in 2010, the “marriage gap” -- the difference in voter participation and voter behavior between married women and unmarried women -- was 30 points.

Saving Family Planning for the Next Generation

06/06/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

For persons below a certain age, the idea that "any person" could be sent to jail for using "any drug, medicinal article, or instrument for the purpose of preventing conception" must seem preposterous.

In State of the Union, Obama Misses Some Jewish Domestic Priorities, Ignores Israel

01/26/2011
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) – Civility? Check. Clean energy? Check. Health care? Check. Immigration? Check. Education? You bet.

Isolating Iran? That’s in there.

Poverty, guns, reproductive rights? Israel? Ummm …

President Obama’s State of the Union speech Tuesday night was as notable for what it excluded as what made it in.

Jewish Groups Adjusting Agendas for New GOP-led Congress

01/11/2011
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Faced with a new Congress intent on slashing the U.S. federal budget, Jewish groups are trimming their agendas to hew to its contours.

On issues from Israel aid to the environment to elderly care, Jewish organizations are planning to promote priorities that would find favorable reception in the new Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives. The groups are trying to build alliances based on shared interests and recasting pitches for existing programs as Republican-friendly.

Achieving a More Perfect Union: An Agenda for the New Congress

01/05/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

The newly elected leaders in the House of Representatives plan to open the 112th session by reading the Constitution into the record. That's not a bad beginning - this Congress must dedicate itself to addressing fundamental problems in order to keep alive the promise of our constitution's preamble: "to...establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity."

Nancy Ratzan

Joe Lieberman spearheads 'Don't Ask' repeal, DREAM act dies

Well, I'll say this for Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), the only Orthodox Jew in the Senate: he lives up to his party label as “independent.”

Just when it looked like he was just a hair's breadth from being a conservative Republican, he led the charge to repeal the military's Don't Ask Don't Tell policy, which passed both Houses of Congress over the weekend.

This despite the fact that his best buddy and the guy he supported for the presidency in 2008, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), was possibly the most vociferous critic of repeal.

Nancy Kaufman to NCJW, and why I like this organization

JTA's  Ron Kampeas has a nice profile of Nancy Kaufman, who'll take the reins at the National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW) in January, and it reminded me why I like this organization.

Nancy Kaufman Going National with Model Twinning Social Justice and Israel

12/15/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- With the prospect for the first American universal health care plan apparently dimming in Massachusetts because the three outsize personalities vital to its passage -- the state's governor, its House speaker and its Senate president -- could not agree on the details, Nancy Kaufman came to the rescue.

Reform, NCJW Slam ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ Failure

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Two Jewish groups expressed regret at the U.S. Senate's failure to repeal the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays.

A repeal of the policy, which requires the discharge of gay servicemen and women who reveal their orientation, was attached to a defense spending bill. It failed Dec. 9 on a procedural vote to garner the 60 votes needed to advance to debate.

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