music

Jewish Soul Music For Tots

05/14/2013
Associate Editor

For many Park Slope tots, Saturday morning means jamming with Debbie Brukman at Temple Beth Elohim.

Brukman, a music teacher with a local coffeehouse following, regularly fills the Reform temple’s large social hall with her “Shir L’Shabbat” sing-alongs for young children and their families.

Brukman had already been teaching “Jewish soul” music in the temple’s nursery school six years ago when Rabbi Andrew Bachman encouraged her to develop a Shabbat program.

“Since bleary-eyed parents of young kids are looking for something to do on Saturday morning, we figured, why not invite them to a Shabbat party with Debbie Brukman?” he told The Jewish Week in an e-mail. “The woman has a heart of gold and we’re blessed to have her in the CBE family.”

Brukman’s Shabbat repertoire combines familiar Jewish preschool songs with Jewish melodies from Uganda, Israeli song festivals and her original compositions. Her band features mandolin, banjo, piano, and hand drums — and toddlers are encouraged to bring their own instruments.

Her fans include novelist Jonathan Safran Foer who frequently listens to her album (available on iTunes, Amazon and debbiebrukman.com) with his children.

“There are precious few CDs that bring a smile to all four passengers in our car,” he says in an album blurb. “These songs — these catchy and inspiring melodies, sung with such obvious and sincere enthusiasm — always lift our spirits. If our dog could smile, she’d smile, too.”

julie.inthemix@gmail.com

Shulamit Seidler-Feller

The 2000-Year-Old Hope

Not only is Hatikvah the national anthem of Israel, but Jews around the world have sung it for 135 years.

Auschwitz' Musical Geography

Auschwitz has a musical as well as physical geography, contends a Stanford University doctoral candidate in German studies. It helped the guards maintain control, and helped prisoners resist.

Using survivor testimonies and camp administration records, Melissa Kagen has mapped the music of Auschwitz: what was played, who played it and where.

A Stanford doctoral candidate has mapped Auschwitz' music: both forced and free.

Alicia Jo Rabins, Art-rocking the women of the Bible.

05/22/2012

Alicia Jo Rabins, 34

Twitter: @ohaliciajo, @girlsintrouble
www.girlsintroublemusic.com

Growing up, Alicia Jo Rabins never gave much thought to Jewish tradition. She was raised secular, in a mostly non-Jewish section of Baltimore.

Alicia Jo Rabins

A Concert Of Reconciliation

Catholic group honors Jews in free Lincoln Center event.

05/01/2012
Associate Editor

Other than the Zionist revival of a Jewish state, the most remarkable — once inconceivable — development for Jews after 2,000 years may be the 180-degree Vatican shift from enmity against Judaism and Jews to an official policy of reconciliation and love for its “elder brother” in faith.

Kiko Arguello, head of The Neocatechumenal Way, has written “The Suffering of the Innocents” as “a bridge of reconciliation.”

iTunes Labels Jewish Music As 'Christian & Gospel'

09/20/2011

(JTA) – Apple’s iTunes has put some of the most well-known Jewish and chasidic singers in the online music store “Christian & Gospel" section.

The Jerusalem Post reported Sunday that musicians such as Avraham Fried, an Orthodox Jew; Mordechai Ben-David; and Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach all have some albums categorized in iTunes’ “Christian & Gospel” genre section.

Commentary Kicks A Dead Horse: A Eulogy for JDub Records

For the young, artistic, mostly Brooklyn-based set, JDub Records was a boon. Founded in 2001, it announced this week that it was shutting its doors because of money problems.  It's a real loss to the Jewish community. To be sure, the closest JDub ever got to mainstream success was by being an early booster of Matisyahu, though if you live in New York, or L.A., Miami, or San Francisco, they've brought lesser-known (though I think much better) musicians to your town that most others probably never heard of. 

JDub Closing For Financial Reasons

07/12/2011
Staff Writer

After nearly nine years of operation and 35 album releases, JDub has announced that it will close up shop for financial reasons.

The not-for-profit record label that is best known for helping to launch the career of reggae star Matisyahu worked to help Jews in their 20s and 30s “forge vibrant connections to Judaism through music, media and cultural events,” according to its mission statement.

Reggae star Matisyahu is the most prominent performer whose career was launched by JDub.
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