music

A Violin That’s A Survivor

11/26/2014
Staff Writer
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On the first day of WQXR Radio’s musical instrument drive in March to benefit the city’s public school children, a staff member took a microphone to the drop-off site at Lincoln Center to interview donors.

Joseph Feingold and his violin, which has “some story.” Courtesy of WQXR

The Little Miracle That Connected Me To HaShem

Hashem works in interesting ways. In the middle 1990s, I had a really good psychotherapist who went for another job and I was broken up about it. Mom had her own health issues and it also bothered her that I lost a therapist we really trusted. I was depressed and Mom wanted to cheer me up.

It was Chanukah time and she was out shopping at the Roosevelt Mall in Northeast Philadelphia and there was a Radio Shack that was having a grand opening sale. They were selling radios and Walkmans and knowing my love for music, she thought, “This will cheer Phyllis up.”

Phyllis Lit

Jeremiah Lockwood’s ‘Blueish’ Education

10/22/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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For the time being, New York native guitar wizard Jeremiah Lockwood is a resident of Palo Alto, Calif. Make that “reluctant resident.”

Elijah Staley (aka Carolina Slim), left, mentored the young Jeremiah Lockwood (right) in the art of the Piedmont blues.

Starting Late, But Not Too Late

In a memoir about music and taking risks, Ari Goldman takes up the cello (again) — at a certain age.

Culture Editor
07/16/2014

As he was approaching his 60th birthday, the author and journalism professor Ari Goldman took up the cello, an instrument he had played on and off — mostly off, of late — for the last 35 years. He decided to adopt a regimen of regular practice, lessons and playing with a group, and set a personal goal — playing publicly for many friends at his 60th birthday party.

A devotee of classical music, Ari Goldman finds his voice by returning to playing the cello. Kali Kotoski

The Music Of Spanish Exile

In her N.Y. debut, a Catalan singer and lutenist moves from Sephardic songs to John Donne.

07/15/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Clara Sanabras knows something about exile. The thirty-something Catalan singer was born in France, raised in Barcelona and for the past 20 years has lived in London. Her family history is so complicated that even she finds it a bit amusing. Her career path has had enough unlikely turns for an entire music festival.

The cover of Sanabras’ new CD, translated as “Scattered Flight.” Hill & Aubrey

Punk Rock Pioneer 'Tommy Ramone' Passes Away At Age 65

The drummer known as Tommy Ramone passed away on Friday due to bile duct cancer. Though he was only 65, he was the last living original member of the Ramones, and instrumental in the creation of punk rock as a musical genre.

Tommy was born Erdélyi Tamás in Budapest to two Holocaust survivors; the couple had hidden with neighbors for the duration of the war. The Erdélyi family immigrated to the United States when Tamás was four.

Tommy Ramone. Wikipedia

A Composer Has His Debut — At 82

03/19/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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It’s unusual for a composer to debut his first opera at the age of 82.

Then again, Harry Bialor is an unusual composer. His opera, “Masada,” is having its world premiere March 23 at the JCC of Staten Island (1466 Manor Rd. 718 475-5200) as part of a UJA-Federation of New York-funded Jewish Music Month program. The piece will be performed by Voyces and Young Voyces, two S.I.-based ensembles, conducted by Michael Sirotta and accompanied by pianist Mimi Stern-Wolfe.

A Holocaust survivor, Harry Bailor tackles the story of “Masada” for his first opera. George Robinson

Prayer Songs

When I was younger, I strived to emulate my two older brothers. I did so in many ways, but I particularly wanted to mimic their passion for playing an instrument. Others told me that I was too young and should wait a year or two to begin. Then Rebecca Teplow took one look at my fingers, after her piano lesson with my eldest brother, and told me that now was a perfect time to begin. I was thrilled.

Rebecca Teplow. Photo courtesy Hoebermann Studio

Your weekly guide to what's hot in New York area arts.

10/22/2014
Calendars Editor
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THE BUZZ

SHULAMIT

For the second time this year, a musical takes as its inspiration the biblical “Song of Songs.” “Shulamit,” a Hebrew-language drama (with English supertitles), is the brainchild of Dina Pruzhansky. (It follows Andrew Beall and Neil Van Leeuwen’s “Song of Solomon” this summer.) Pruzhansky is a COJECO BluePrint Fellow (the program facilitates projects from young Jewish adults of Russian origin). Radio broadcaster Robert Sherman hosts the opening night event.

Image of Helena Rubinstein, from exhibit at The Jewish Museum.

From Nachlaot To New York

Rav Raz Hartman is usually found in a crowded shul in Jerusalem’s Nachlaot neighborhood, reached by a steep staircase. His shul fuses music and mysticism, attracting Jews across the denominational and sartorial spectrum. A Jerusalem hipster may be swaying next to someone dressed in a flowing white robe.

Rav Raz Hartman at Mechon Hadar. Courtesy of Mechon Hadar
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