Moishe House

Watching Frankenstorm From Inside Moishe House

Frankenstorm Sandy brought us New Yorkers a new perception of this city, teaching us about a “New York City is a city that can actually sleep.” This new New York is a city that is under water. It suffered over 30 casualties, the evacuation of 400,000-plus people, the loss of water and electricity.

The city that sleeps? Oy. Wikimedia Commons

The Boy in the Green Shirt

Here’s how it works with these service trips: They lure you in under the guise of work, telling you you’ll be helping to build a school, volunteering at a clinic, or contributing to the community in some meaningful way, and you get on that plane to incredible fanfare (mostly imagined), feeling like a hero for what you’re about to do.

The abandoned synagogue in Ambover, Ethiopia is accessible only by rocky, dirt roads.

A Twentysomething Jew Wants To Talk To You

Here's the predicament.

We're in a place long without any structured Judaism, between college communities and settling down into family life. Where do we find our connection with Judaism? When is there time while we're building careers? Why observe Shabbat with secular life laying claim to Friday nights? And with most synagogues lacking a population of young adults, how do we even find peers?

Let me tell you about one solution.

Moishe House, and havdalah: a solution to a twentysomething's predicament.

‘Second Stage’ For Startups

Samuel Bronfman and others begin exploring intermediate funding strategies.

04/24/2012
Staff Writer

G-dcast.com is a poster child of the Jewish startup sector, the grass-roots movement that aims to reach the disinterested and unaffiliated by offering new ways — such as record labels, bike rides and online Shabbat services — to connect with Judaism. Over 3,000 educators around the world use G-dcast’s funky parsha-of-the-week videos, which have been viewed over a million times on the web, the group says.

Why, then, is G-dcast about to find itself out on the street?

G-dcast.com’s quirky biblical videos.

Moishe House Hitting Big Apple

First foray into New York City for community-building project.

10/12/2011
Associate Editor

Moses (or Moishe, if you prefer) is poised to step foot in the Promised Land — of diaspora Judaism, that is.

Moishe House, the fast-growing outreach/community-building initiative for Jews in their 20s, is coming to New York.

Moishe Housers in Baltimore. New York locations not yet nailed down.

‘Cool’ Judaism For Moishe Housers

10/11/2011
Associate Editor

Note: This article is a sidebar to a larger article about Moishe House.

‘It’s so cool you could come for Shabbat,” a young woman with wild hair tells the hipster man at her mezuzah-adorned doorway. “Hope you’re ready for your first battle!”

So begins one of three short animated instructional videos aimed at helping Moishe House residents learn or review Jewish blessings and rituals needed for hosting Shabbat dinner, Havdalah and Sukkot.

Generation Gap On Intermarriage Views

You probably won’t be surprised by one of the key findings of a new study, since it confirms what many of us have been observing for awhile: Jewish leaders in their 20s and 30s are much less concerned about intermarriage than are older Jewish leaders.

But you may be surprised that the person (dispassionately) reporting this trend is Jack Wertheimer, a Jewish Theological Seminary professor and frequent contributor to Commentary, in a study for the Avi Chai Foundation.

The 25 Houses Of Moishe, And Counting

02/13/2009
Editor and Publisher
Establishment organizations should take note of a little-known but international phenomenon in communal living among Jewish twentysomethings called Moishe House. Professional executives and big-time philanthropists would be wise to explore, especially now, how a tiny operation could have such a wide reach, touching Jewish lives in important ways while spending relatively little money. And the key may simply be to trust and empower the right young people to determine how they want to express their Jewishness, and pay close attention to the results.
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