journalism

Israel And The Press: The Same Old Battle

05/23/2008
Editor and Publisher
Taking part in a panel the other night at the JCC in Manhattan on “Israel, The Jews and The Press: Exploding the Myths,” my colleagues — Clyde Haberman of The New York Times and Sam Freedman of the Columbia Journalism School and the Times — and I felt like we were in a time warp.  

The New Journalism?

09/11/1998
Associate Editor

Religion As A ‘Blind Spot’ For Journalists

02/06/2009
Editor and Publisher
While the tragic violence in Mumbai was still unfolding on Nov. 27, a Washington Post report noted: “It is not known how the attackers seized on the low-key Chabad House.” It was one of several press reports at the time that professed surprise when the best-known Jewish site in the city became a target for the gunmen, later identified as Pakistan-based Islamic terrorists.

Stop The Presses? Let’s Hope Not

07/24/2009
Editor and Publisher
 The newspaper business in America is in deep decline, bordering on a deathwatch in some cities, and, alas, Jewish newspapers are no exception to this troubling trend.   The combination of the national economic meltdown, the trend among younger people away from print journalism and the “original sin” of news organizations making content available for free online, where more and more people go for information, has created a perfect storm for the news industry in general.  

Jewish Week Wins Five Writing Awards

07/01/2009
Jewish Week staff writers Stewart Ain and Tamar Snyder and correspondent Hella Winston were among the winners of the 2008 Simon Rockower Awards for excellence in Jewish journalism, which were announced last week. The paper also won top honors for its annual magazine, Directions, and second place in its circulation division for editorial writing.

Stop the Presses? I Hope Not

Will Jewish newspapers survive the journalism meltdown?

Editor and Publisher

Gary Rosenblatt, Editor & PublisherThe newspaper business in America is in deep decline, bordering on a deathwatch in some cities, and, alas, Jewish newspapers are no exception to this troubling trend.

The combination of the national economic meltdown, the trend among younger people away from print journalism and the “original sin” of news organizations making content available for free online, where more and more people go for information, has created a perfect storm for the news industry in general.

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