journalism

Brian Williams And Parachute Journalism

There is another part of the Brian Williams story getting too little attention.  It is when the million dollar New York celebrity anchors drop in out of the sky to "report" on the crisis du jour that they never really covered.

All it takes is a disaster, tsunami, massacre, war, hurricane and, of course, easy access for planes carrying their camera crews and makeup teams.  That's why you're more likely to see them in the Middle East or Europe than Africa or South America.

Why Judaism Needs Journalism

12/30/2014
Special To The Jewish Week

There’s a tendency in the Jewish world to look for big solutions to big problems. One of those problems is the disheartening fact that most Jews today are simply not that interested in Judaism.

David Suissa

When Journalists Are The Story

Saying a sad goodbye to some NYT stalwarts, and The New Republic.

12/17/2014
Editor and Publisher

The job of the journalist is to cover the story. In recent days, though, it seems that journalists have become the story, and not in a good way.

Gary Rosenblatt

Storm Coverage Presents Dilemma

This week’s issue of The Jewish Week includes the latest in a series of stories the paper’s staff has written on the aftermath of Sandy since the Superstorm struck New York, and the surrounding Northeast states, three months ago. This week’s focus, in a report I wrote, is southern Brooklyn – the Atlantic coast neighborhoods like Seagate, Coney Island and Brighton Beach, which suffered a disproportionate amount of flood-caused damage.

Satellite image of Sandy: Storm presented a challange for journalists. Via NASA

Hebrew Media Hurting, But Israeli English Press Booming

Journalism landscape changing rapidly, led by Adelson-backed free paper.

10/23/2012
JTA

Tel Aviv — On Oct. 17, seven Israeli English news websites led with seven different stories.

Israel’s English-language media, though expanding, faces uncertain future.

All She Wrote: Signing Off from The Jewish Week

Eventually, this day had to come, the day when I wrote my last blog for The Jewish Week. In the fall I'll be starting a Ph.D. program in U.S. history at Columbia, which means I'll no longer be able to hold this job.  But the good news is that I'll be able to freelance, so you can expect to see my by-line somewhere in The Jewish Week in the coming months.  

An Apology For An Offensive Blog

I have great admiration and respect for my colleague, Jewish Week Associate Editor Jonathan Mark, and for his writing, as I have for the important value of journalistic freedom of expression.

But a blog Jonathan wrote Feb. 23 and posted on our site that, in part, spoke unfavorably about Reform rabbis went beyond the boundaries of spirited debate, in my opinion, and I apologize for it having appeared.

It was removed from our web site.

AIPAC's spokesman as press punching bag

So AIPAC has a new press spokeman. I wish Ari Goldberg well; he's going to need it.

In 25 years of covering the pro-Israel lobby I've grown to have a certain sympathy for its press minions – at times human punching bags standing between a skeptical press and wary organization officials who shun publicity – except when they want it.

Jewish Community’s Blind Spot: Not Listening To Our Students

The American Jewish community spends a good deal of time and money worrying about campus life these days, particularly regarding how Israel is criticized, attacked and delegitimized by professors, students and outside agitators.

Live Like a Movie Star

12/23/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

When I'm not pouring over my Chumash or studying the Talmud, you might find me, upon occasion, flipping through an issue of Entertainment Weekly magazine for alternative inspiration. Truth be told, EW wins out over the big books 99.9% of the time, as it is significantly less cumbersome sitting on the magazine rack of my treadmill.

Deborah Grayson Riegel
Syndicate content