Jews

Gallup fills in blank in AJC poll: Jews still like Obama

In response to this week’s American Jewish Committee Survey of Jewish Public Opinion,  I expressed regret that while it showed growing skepticism over elements of his Mideast policy, the poll left open the question of overall Jewish support for a president who won 78 percent of the Jewish vote in last year’s election.

Today we got an answer.

AJC Poll: Jews Remain Centrist

10/30/2009

The poll describes a Jewish community capable of filtering out the static generated by extremists on both sides and coming to independent, reasoned conclusions.

Listen to the pundits, and it’s easy to come to the conclusion U.S.-Israel relations are on the rocks. But American Jews don’t buy that — despite the efforts by some to stir up conflict.

The Wooing Of Gen-X

01/02/1998
Editor & Publisher
How to reach young, unaffiliated Jews and bring them into the fold? It’s been the Jewish community’s No. 1 question for years. Now, one of the Jewish world’s wealthiest and most influential philanthropists thinks he has an answer. And the emphasis is more on culture than religion as a gateway to Jewish life.

Can’t We All Just Get Along?

10/16/1998
Editor & Publisher
Seeking to answer the religious pluralism symposium question — “Can We Jews Get Along?” — three leading rabbis of different denominations posited a cautiously hopeful response. Despite strong ideological disagreements, they addressed the need to work toward change within the nexus of religion-state relations in Israel.

Filling The Void

04/23/1999
Editor and Publisher
A few days into his post as acting president of the new national entity for Jewish communal activity, Stephen Solender apologizes to a visitor for not knowing his way around the organization’s headquarters in the block-long old Port Authority Building on Eighth Avenue in Chelsea. His large office has no artwork on the walls and the bookshelves are bare.

Papering Over Hot-Button Issues

04/29/2005
Editor & Publisher
Twenty years after Irving “Yitz” Greenberg, a prominent American rabbi, predicted that the growing ideological rift among traditional and liberal Jewish movements would cause an irrevocable split in religious life, the denominational wars have subsided.

Papering Over Hot-Button Issues

04/29/2005
Editor & Publisher
Twenty years after Irving “Yitz” Greenberg, a prominent American rabbi, predicted that the growing ideological rift among traditional and liberal Jewish movements would cause an irrevocable split in religious life, the denominational wars have subsided.But in a new report commissioned by the American Jewish Committee, to be released next week at the group’s annual meeting in Washington, an expert warns that key religious issues have been papered over rather than resolved — and just under the surface remain certain to flare up anew.

Student Activism Moves From Rallies To Journals

12/23/2005
Editor and Publisher
Last year, Bari Weiss was one of a small group of student activists on the Columbia University campus protesting the alleged anti-Israel bias of some Mideast studies professors, which became an international issue.This year, as a junior, she has channeled her energies into helping to found The Current, a campus journal at Columbia dealing with current politics, culture and Jewish affairs.“I’m an activist at heart,” Weiss said this week, “but I think that a journal of ideas may have a longer lasting impact than protests and rallies.”

Jewish Unity, Hanging By A Thread

01/02/1998
Editor and Publisher
Has the struggle over preserving Jewish unity led, ironically, to an irrevocable division between Israel and American Jewry? That’s the view of some observers who say that, regardless of the outcome of the deliberations of the Neeman Committee, charged with satisfying Orthodox, Conservative and Reform religious demands in Israel, the relationship between the Jewish state and American Jewry will never be the same.
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