Jewish politics

Some back and forth on Sarah Palin and the Jews

Benyamin Korn's op-ed response to my recent blog on polls suggesting former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin is lagging with more educated voters is something rare in political discourse these days – which is to say, civil. He made his points, he didn't hurl invectives, he wasn't nasty.

But he was also wrong on a few counts, it seems to me.

The Chosen: Jewish Members in the 112th U.S. Congress

11/05/2010

NEW YORK (JTA) -- The following is a list of the 39 Jewish members -- 12 senators and 27 representatives -- who are expected to serve in the 112th U.S. Congress, which is set to convene in January:

U.S. SENATE

Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.)*

Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.)**

Benjamin Cardin (D-Md.)

Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.)

Al Franken (D-Minn.)

Herb Kohl (D-Wisc.)

Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.)

Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.)

Carl Levin (D-Mich.)

Bernard Sanders (I-Vt.)

Two Sides to Every Debate - And I Want My Side to Win

11/04/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

The East Bank of the East River is where I’ve lived for the past twenty years, in a territory known as Brooklyn, which began as Native American land and was then settled by the Dutch. George Washington and his troops beat a hasty retreat from the British in the park where I run. It is now among the most sought after places to live in New York City.

Rabbi Andy Bachman

Dueling exit polls, Sestak-Toomey and the eternal J Street debate

The dust has settled from Tuesday's electoral earthquake, which was about a 6.2 on the political Richter scale, and  the spinmeisters are hard at work telling us how to interpret the piles of rubble.

As promised, I've been looking at exit polls about the high-profile Senate race in Pennsylvania. The exit polls aren't exactly conclusive – and aren't exactly in agreement.

Exit polls point to dramatic conservative surge

Looking at some of the early exit polls, there's a fascinating one by NPR.

According to the public radio folks, 41 percent of today's voters labeled themselves “conservative.”

Why is that important? It's up from 34 percent in 2008, 32 percent in 2006. That's a pretty dramatic shift, and points to how the final tallies are likely to go tonight.

It will be very interesting to see if we get some Jewish numbers on that question

A most un-illuminating election

Question: what have the congressional election campaigns told us about the state of the debate over U.S. Middle East policy?

Answer: Nothing good.

The fierce, bitter midterm campaigns have demonstrated once again that a small but vocal minority in the Jewish community thinks only of partisan concerns – partisan support for a political faction in Israel, or for the Republican party in this country – and not much about the need to strengthen U.S.-Israel ties or to ensure support for Israel is a bi-partisan affair, not just another partisan wedge issue.

Video: Interviews with Candidates for Attorney General

10/28/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

The Jewish Week’s MetroPolitics video blog caught up with both candidates in the race for attorney general, the most competitive election on Tuesday’s statewide ballot.

For the interview with Democratic State Sen. Eric Schneiderman, click here:

For the interview with Republican Staten Island District Attorney Daniel Donavan, click here:

 

The Jewish Week Interviews Attorney General-Elect Eric Schneiderman

State Sen. Eric Schneiderman discusses his campaign for attorney general, school vouchers, Albany scandals, Al Sharpton and more in an interview with The Jewish Week's Adam Dickt

Challenger: Nadler Not Pro-Israel

10/27/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

Republican Susan Kone, who hopes to unseat Democrat Rep. Jerrold Nadler next week, says the congressman has been too silent about President Barack Obama’s Middle East policies.

“Absurd,” says Nadler’s campaign.

Election 2010: The Jewish Democratic View

Jewish Values are Democratic Values.

10/27/2010

During the last Presidential election, Jewish voters made a significant difference in helping put Democrats back in power. We came out in full force to show the country that Democratic values are truly Jewish values. This election cycle our core beliefs are again being challenged by a Republican Party that continues to move further and further to the right. On November 2, we one again have a chance to make an impact on the outcome of key races.

NJDC president and CEO David A. Harris
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