Jewish leadership

A Pioneer Who Brought People Together

Staff Writer
Morton Kornreich was remembered this week as a Jewish communal leader whose vision and talent enabled him to serve as the first chairman of the newly merged UJA-Federation of New York and to later help refocus The Jewish Week, of which he was a founding board member. Mr. Kornreich, who died last Tuesday in Boca Raton, Fla., of pulmonary fibrosis, had homes in Florida and White Plains. He was 82.

‘You’ve Got Sermons’

Staff Writer
With tens of millions of people watching YouTube daily, a Long Beach, L.I., rabbi has decided to use it to post mini-sermons to his congregants and others. “People are sick and tired of reading rabbis’ articles,” said Rabbi Eli Goodman, spiritual leader of the Bachurei Chemed Congregation, an Orthodox synagogue also known as the Bach Jewish Center. “Snail mail is outdated; we’re trying to focus on e-mails. And we have a Web site,

New Pulpit For Ex-Lincoln Square Rabbi

Staff Writer
Rabbi Adam Mintz, whose contract as spiritual leader of Lincoln Square Synagogue was not renewed following a power struggle with the leadership of the 600-member Orthodox congregation, has formed a new congregation with a group of his supporters that meets for Sabbath services at the Dorot Building at 171 W. 85th St.

Moshe Rivlin, Ex-JNF Chair, Dies At 79

Staff Writer
Moshe Rivlin, the former world chairman of the Jewish National Fund and director general of the Jewish Agency for Israel, died Tuesday at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan following a heart attack. He was 79. Mr. Rivlin, a seventh-generation Sabra who retired from JNF in 1997 after 21 years, lived in Jerusalem with his wife, Ruth. He and his wife were in the city visiting their two daughters.

Helping Rabbis See Signs Of Family Violence

Editor and Publisher
When Diana Manber, as a girl growing up, asked her rabbi why he had not intervened to help her mother, who was a victim of spousal abuse, “the rabbi said he had suspected something was wrong but he didn’t have the words to ask,” she recalled.Now a rabbi herself, Manber is helping people “to find their voice.”

Breaking: Rabbi Herbert Friedman -- An Appreciation

Editor and Publisher
‘I smuggled weapons to Palestine, before Israel was born, thus breaking U.S. arms-embargo laws,” writes Rabbi Herbert Friedman on the first page of his 1999 memoir, “Roots Of The Future”; “led convoys of refugees across hostile European borders to freedom; ‘liberated’ crates of medieval religious documents from U.S. Army custody in Germany and transferred to a professor in Jerusalem; and committed similar, illegal or borderline-illegal acts long forgotten.”

Creative Thinkers Get Big Bucks

Editor and Publisher
Continuing a trend among philanthropies to highlight and support the creative work of individual thinkers and activists, the Avi Chai Foundation this week announced the first winners of its new Fellows program.

Will Grandma Seltzer Go To Washington?

Staff Writer
It was after 5 p.m. and almost all of the television cameras, newspaper reporters and photographers had left the waterfront Bellport, L.I., home of Regina Seltzer last Wednesday when Rep. Carolyn McCarthy called from Washington to extend congratulations after Seltzer's apparent upset primary victory over Rep. Michael Forbes. "How's it going?" asked fellow Democrat McCarthy. "I think you know how it's going because you went through this once too,"Seltzer said, referring to McCarthyís own 1996 upset victory over Republican incumbent Dan Frisa.

Connecting To Israel

Staff Writer
Carole Solomon declined when asked if she and her husband would join a Jewish federation "leadership" trip to Israel during a cease-fire in the Yom Kippur War. "I said no because I had two little kids," Solomon, a self-described "very assimilated" fifth-generation German Jew, recalled of the 1973 invitation. "But this person said this was an opportunity to witness history. If you go, he said, you will never forget it, and if you don't go, you won't remember what you stayed home for."

A Rock From Shelter Rock

Staff Writer
Following his retirement after 36 years as the senior rabbi of the Shelter Rock Jewish Center in Roslyn, L.I., and then being called on to serve the past year as the interim senior rabbi of Temple Israel in Great Neck, Myron Fenster is clearly enjoying himself. "I got compliments this year I never heard," he says with a broad grin. And now, as he again contemplates retirement at the end of November, Rabbi Fenster plans to draw upon his 54-year rabbinical career during his High Holy Days sermons.
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