Jewish Education

Panel Discussion: The Jewish community's obligation to children with special needs

 On May 24, 2010, a panel of experts gathered at Cong. Shearith Israel in Manhattan to discuss the Jewish community's obligation to children with special needs.

 

Grant Pushes Historic Partnership of Seminaries

05/25/2010

NEW YORK (JTA) -- Spurred by a major grant from one of the largest Jewish foundations, the rabbinical seminaries of three major synagogue movements are forging a groundbreaking partnership to train Jewish educators.

The Jim Joseph Foundation announced Monday that it was giving a combined $33 million to the Reform movement’s Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute for Religion, the Modern Orthodox Yeshiva University and the Conservative movement’s Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

Technology and Jewish Education Conference

Jewish techie Ari Davidow listened in on JESNA's recent "Technology and Jewish Education" conference and posted some of his observations on the Jewish Women's Archive blog. JESNA's conference is run through its Lippman Kanfer Institute.

Technology and Jewish Education

How Bad Is The Day School Crisis?

05/27/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
While no one can deny that yeshivot and day schools and the parents who utilize them are in a crisis over the skyrocketing cost of full-time Jewish education, there is no consensus about how unique and how critical that crisis is. And even less agreement on where to focus solutions. That schism was apparent at a forum co-sponsored by The Jewish Week and the Jewish Values Network in Midtown last week, as three rabbis with firsthand knowledge of the crisis shared ideas.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

A Conservative Remarriage

05/06/2009
Assistant Managing Editor
In a bid to strengthen Conservative life in one of the Brooklyn’s most heavily Orthodox neighborhoods, the East Midwood Jewish Center has reached an agreement to keep 160 day school students learning on its premises. The accord will be a new phase in the 50-year relationship between the landmark, 85-year-old Jewish Center and the East Midwood Hebrew Day School, also known as the Harry Halpern Educational Center, and pump new life into an institution that has been struggling financially.

Yeshiva Brain Drain Feared

08/02/2002
Staff Writer
Now that city teachers have won a hefty, 16 percent pay raise, Jewish education experts are worried about an exodus from day schools to public schools. According to a survey by the Board of Jewish Education of Greater New York last year, the average maximum salary for head teachers at yeshivas and day schools is about $35,000.

`Money For Mitzvahs’

The “Cash for Clunkers” experiment has come and gone, but what was intended for car owners to benefit from increasing their vehicles’ fuel efficiency could be applied to improve Jewish life as well.

The premise would be the same - a valuable voucher or reward going to folks who trade in something less efficient for something on the next level - but our community could make use of it by having consumers of Jewish practice and education be rewarded for stepping up their commitment.

High Praise For Be’er Hagolah

08/04/1999
Staff Writer
When Anna Motsenyat graduated Be’er Hagolah Institute in 1994, her last day of classes did not mean goodbye. “I kept in touch,” said Motsenyat, a 22-year-old who came here from St. Petersburg in 1987. Many of Be’er Hagolah’s students maintain ties with the yeshiva which, located in Starrett City, currently has an enrollment of 1,000 students from the former Soviet Union. But Motsenyat took her connection with the school a step further last year when she returned to her alma mater as a Judaic Studies teacher and program coordinator.
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