Jewish activism

Joe Lieberman spearheads 'Don't Ask' repeal, DREAM act dies

Well, I'll say this for Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), the only Orthodox Jew in the Senate: he lives up to his party label as “independent.”

Just when it looked like he was just a hair's breadth from being a conservative Republican, he led the charge to repeal the military's Don't Ask Don't Tell policy, which passed both Houses of Congress over the weekend.

This despite the fact that his best buddy and the guy he supported for the presidency in 2008, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), was possibly the most vociferous critic of repeal.

Nancy Kaufman to NCJW, and why I like this organization

JTA's  Ron Kampeas has a nice profile of Nancy Kaufman, who'll take the reins at the National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW) in January, and it reminded me why I like this organization.

Some reflections on Richard Holbrooke, and a contrast with Kissinger

Update: the Washington Post has "clarified" its earlier report on Richard Holbrooke's last words. Read it here.

Fighting Fires at Home and Abroad

12/13/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

As the lights of the Chanukah candles burned, students took time from studying for finals to help deal with fires of a different sort on campus and in Israel. Anti-Semitism, anti-Israel activities, and the devastating impact of fires in Israel all intruded on pre-exam schedules.

David Meyer

Fighting Fires at Home and Abroad

12/13/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

As the lights of the Chanukah candles burned, students took time from studying for finals to help deal with fires of a different sort on campus and in Israel. Anti-Semitism, anti-Israel activities, and the devastating impact of fires in Israel all intruded on pre-exam schedules.

David Meyer

Remembering the Soviet Jewry vigil in Washington - and a rare moment of Jewish unity

The Soviet Jewry movement was in the news over the weekend because of Henry Kissinger's astoundingly offensive statement to former President Richard Nixon that “if they put Jews into gas chambers in the Soviet Union, it is not an American concern.”  Thirty-six years after he resigned in disgrace, we're still learning just how anti-Semitic – and how bigoted toward just about every other minority – Nixon and his cronies really were.

But in Washington there was another reason to remember that unique moment in Jewish history.

Jewish Groups Praise Child Nutrition Law, With Qualms

12/03/2010

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Jewish groups praised the renewal of a law funding school meals, but expressed concern that it was financed in part by money designated for food stamps.

The approval in the U.S. House of Representatives Wednesday of the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act means the bill -- which had been subject to some last minute wrangling -- is ready for enactment by the president.

The bill extends for another ten years funding for school lunches and breakfasts for children from families that depend on the meals, estimated at 4.2 million households.

Some back and forth on Sarah Palin and the Jews

Benyamin Korn's op-ed response to my recent blog on polls suggesting former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin is lagging with more educated voters is something rare in political discourse these days – which is to say, civil. He made his points, he didn't hurl invectives, he wasn't nasty.

But he was also wrong on a few counts, it seems to me.

Lame-duck Congress Jeopardizes School Lunch Program for Poor, Jewish Groups Warn

11/23/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- The framers of an interfaith effort with the grand goal of halving American poverty in the next decade had a small but focused message this week: Keep those school lunches coming.

At a meeting Monday on Capitol Hill at an event attended by congressional staffers, the framers of the effort spoke of a pending vote to reauthorize the Child Nutrition Act, the program which brings school breakfasts and lunches to needy children.

For Jewish Federations, Decline in Donors Dwarfs Recession Woes

11/09/2010
JTA

NEW ORLEANS, La. (JTA) – After three days of schmoozing, sessions and feel-good speeches, the 3,000 or so Jewish federation officials who came to the annual General Assembly may have left New Orleans feeling invigorated.

The view expressed by many top officials was that after two years of a tough recession, the worst is over.

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