Internet

Synagogues Get Their Own (Scape)Goat

09/23/2014 - 20:00
Staff Writer

When Sarah Lefton first came up with the pre-Yom Kippur app eScapegoat, she thought it would be a cute way to bring awareness to the Leviticus story behind the ritual of atonement.

eScapegoat app offers an online way to do repentance for the High Holy Days.

As Online Anti-Semitism Grows, So Do Efforts To Counter It

08/18/2014 - 20:00

Berlin - It’s been 17 years since Suzette Bronkhorst co-founded the Dutch Complaints Bureau for Discrimination on the Internet, but she said she doesn’t remember the level of anti-Semitic speech on social media platforms ever being this high.

Abe Foxman's New Book

Quote Source: 

"Words of hate can easily turn into acts of hate."

E-Rate Program Dogged By Concerns

Government regulators see ‘non-compliance’ among some Jewish schools but no fraud charges.

02/21/2013 - 19:00

Editor's Note: This is the third in a three-part series. For the other articles go here and here.

Nine years ago, Thomas Cline traveled from Washington, D.C., to Brooklyn to tour seven buildings occupied by the United Talmudical Academy.

Computer Corner in Williamsburg is one of the largest E-rate service providers to hareidi schools. Michael Datikash/JW

How Do Haredi Schools Get All That Money?

Service providers haul in millions in tech funds for schools and libraries, but some don’t even have websites.

02/18/2013 - 19:00

Editor's Note: This is second in a three-part series. The first article is here, and the third is here.

From the outside, Computer Corner does not look like a technology business handling million-dollar technology contracts.

Students at a charedi yeshiva in Brooklyn. Michael Datikash/JW

Part I: Haredi Schools Reap Millions In Federal Tech Funds

How does a community that rails against the Web pull in $30 million in one year for its schools from the E-rate program?

02/14/2013 - 19:00

Editor's Note: This article is the first of three parts. Click for part 2. Click for part 3.

At Yeshivat Avir Yakov, an all-boys school in the chasidic enclave of New Square in New York’s Rockland County, students spend the vast majority of their long school days studying religious texts in spartan classrooms furnished only with battered wooden benches and desks. Unlike their counterparts in public or private schools outside the chasidic community, the boys at Avir Yakov do not have access to the Internet or computers in their school because chasidic leaders view the Internet as a corrupting force capable of undermining their way of life.

Students at a charedi yeshiva in Brooklyn. Michael Datikash/JW

NoahPozner.com - Exploiting A Tragedy

When the names of the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut were announced, Jewish media outlets immediately published articles about the youngest victim Noah Pozner, the 6-year-old who was laid to rest earlier this week in a traditional Jewish funeral.

Noah Pozner was the youngest of the 1st grade victims at the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.

Finding Religion Online

Ever since the old AmericaOnline, people have used the Internet as a way to learn more about religion and to engage with likeminded co-religionists. The Senior Religion Editor of Huffington Post, Paul Raushenbush, published an interesting article about the search for religion on the Web. He writes that "Religion is one of the hottest areas of the Internet because religion is one of the most intense and contested arenas of human relations and ideas." He's right.

The Web is the first place many people look to learn more about religion

Checking Your E-Mule on a Donkey In Israel

Back in December 2004, I wrote about my technology experience at the Mamshit Camel Ranch, a Bedouin village in Israel. I explained how funny it was to be at a Bedouin village that appeared to be authentically rustic to the Birthright Israel participants I was chaperoning, but behind-the-scenes the place was equipped with the latest technology.

Tourists at Kfar Kedem in Israel will now have WiFi access while riding donkeys

Ultra-Orthodox are Correct About the Dangers of the Internet

When I first heard that a rally was planned for Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) Jews to protest the Internet, I didn’t think it would attract much attention. After all, the Internet has long been under attack in Haredi communities and their rabbinic leaders have forbidden it in the past.

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