Holocaust

Yad Vashem Vandalized With Anti-Semitic Graffiti

06/11/2012

 

Vandals spray painted anti-Israel and anti-Semitic graffiti at the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum.

The slogans written in Hebrew, including "Hitler, thank you for the Holocaust," "If Hitler did not exist, the Zionists would have invented him," and "The war of the Zionist regime is not the war of the Jewish people," were mostly found at the entrance to the museum and concentrated near the Warsaw Ghetto Square and the memorial to the deportees.

The Role of Jewish Priests: A Matter of Life and Death

05/15/2012
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Jewish priests (Kohannim) are prohibited from attending funerals or encountering the dead (unless it is a close relative). How can the leaders of society neglect one of the most important aspects of community service? Here we learn a value of humility, empowerment, life, and transparency.

Rabbi Yanklowitz is founder and president of Uri L'Tzedek, director of Jewish life and senior Jewish educator at UCLA Hillel.

Making Mischief Of One Kind. And Another.

Remembering Maurice Sendak, who sublimated his unhappy Brooklyn Jewish childhood into literary success.

05/08/2012
Staff Writer

‘Oh please don’t go — we’ll eat you up — we love you so!”

That’s what the Wild Things say to Max when he abandons them to return to his mother, and his supper. It’s an expression of grief that surely rings true to countless children and former children who woke May 8 to learn that Maurice Sendak, creator of “Where the Wild Things Are” and several other beloved children’s books had died earlier that day at 83 of complications from a recent stroke.

Sendak based the Wild Things on aunts and uncles who scared him as a child. Getty Images

On Maurcie Sendak, Adam Yauch, and the Death of Jewish Brooklyn Bohemia

If the death this weekend of Adam Yauch, 47—the Beastie Boys founder, nicknamed MCA—was not enough, today came another blow: the death of Maurice Sendak, at 83.  Both were Jewish artists, pioneers in their respective genres, and both were Brooklyn-born.  That they were born some 35 years apart, and came from worlds quite diff

Obama Adds Bob Dylan, Madeleine Albright To Freedom Medal List

04/27/2012

Madeleine Albright, Bob Dylan, Shimon Peres and Jan Karski will be among 13 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The list was released Thursday. President Obama had previously announced that he was set to confer the medal on Peres, the Israeli president, and Karski, the late Polish resistance fighter who was among the first to document the Nazi genocide.

Obama Adds Bob Dylan, Madeleine Albright To Freedom Medal List

04/27/2012

Madeleine Albright, Bob Dylan, Shimon Peres and Jan Karski will be among 13 recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The list was released Thursday. President Obama had previously announced that he was set to confer the medal on Peres, the Israeli president, and Karski, the late Polish resistance fighter who was among the first to document the Nazi genocide.

The Shoah, Then And Now

04/24/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Even as the Holocaust recedes into the distant past, its effects are as potent as ever. So suggests Rivka Bekerman-Greenberg in her new play, “Eavesdropping on Dreams,” in which a survivor’s toxic trauma is passed along not just to her daughter, but to her granddaughter as well. Produced by the Barefoot Theatre Company, the play is running through mid-May at the Cherry Lane’s Studio Theatre.

Lynn Cohen as Rose, a Holocaust survivor, in Rivka Bekerman-Greenberg “Eavesdropping on Dreams.” Francisco Solorzano

Waiting For The Right Holocaust Angle

Noted young German novelist Daniel Kehlmann is finally tackling Jewishness and the Nazis in a new play.

04/24/2012
Staff Writer

For the past 15 years — which is to say his entire career — the German novelist Daniel Kehlmann, 37, has not written about Jews. In fact, none of his work — from his first novel, published when he was 22 and still in college, to his fifth, titled “Measuring the World” (2006) and Germany’s best-selling novel in more than two decades — even alluded to Nazis or Hitler.

In “Ghosts in Princeton,” Kehlmann, tells the tale of mathematician Kurt Godel, who the Nazis mistakenly believed was Jewish.

Yom Hashoah Thoughts

04/19/2012
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Re-entry from Israel to New York is always a surreal experience for me.  Where I live in central Queens is one of the most densely populated Jewish areas in the United States. There is little Jewish that is lacking here.  Outside of Israel, there are very few, if any, places in the United States where you can get quite as many Israeli products as my greater neighborhood, But after spending ten days in Jerusalem, I am reminded of just how much New York is not Israel.

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is the spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center in Queens.

Holocaust Observances

04/17/2012
Editorial

Yom HaShoah, the day declared by the Knesset six decades ago to serve as the Jewish people’s period of memorial and mourning for the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, takes on a more vital aspect of a Day of Remembrance as the years pass. As the survivors of and witnesses to the horrors of the Third Reich’s near-annihilation of the Jewish people pass on, memory serves an increasingly important role.

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