Holocaust

‘Names, Not Numbers’ Keeps Holocaust Memories Alive

05/30/2008
Editor and Publisher
The aging World War II veteran paused at the end of an hour-long interview and addressed the two teenage girls across the table who had been asking him questions. “You have to promise me something,” Sander Dulitz said to them, after describing his three years of combat in the European theater, including landing at Normandy and visiting the Buchenwald concentration camp shortly after it was liberated in the spring of 1945. “Promise me you won’t forget this,” he said, “that you’ll pass it on.”

Graduations With A Shoah Theme

06/23/2000
Staff Writer
"My mother was killed in Auschwitz. If David Irving had won, my mother would have been a victim a second time! So too would everybody else who perished there." "Congratulations on achieving not only the ruling in your favor, but also the justice for survivors."

Polish Gov’t: Auschwitz Crosses To Be Removed

In a unexpected development, the bitter confrontation between Jewish groups and the Polish government over Christian symbols at the Auschwitz death camp moved a few steps closer to resolution this week with a letter from Prime Minister Jerzy Buzek outlini

12/04/1998
Washington Correspondent
Washington — In a unexpected development, the bitter confrontation between Jewish groups and the Polish government over Christian symbols at the Auschwitz death camp moved a few steps closer to resolution this week with a letter from Prime Minister Jerzy Buzek outlining the steps his government is prepared to take to end the conflict. In the letter, Buzek pledged that his government will “remove all new crosses” as soon as possible.

Shoah Funding Split To Get Fresh Scrutiny

03/07/2003
Staff Writer
Faced with a growing chorus of criticism from across the Jewish community and heart-wrenching news stories of survivors unable to pay medical bills, the organization that handles the allocation of Holocaust restitution funds is to re-examine its disbursement policy at its July board meeting here.

Return To Hell

10/10/2003
Staff Writer
Even 60 years later, Philip Bialowitz of Queens is haunted by the Nazi killing factory at Sobibor, Poland. "I still have sleepless nights," Bialowitz, 74, confides. "I still see the killings. You could see the smoke miles away. They killed my two sisters and a niece at Sobibor. My niece was 8 years old and knew she was going to die." He says that when he first arrived at Sobibor, someone asked if he came with his family.

Netting A Notorious Collection

09/12/2003
Staff Writer
Thekla Stein Nordwind of Scottsdale, Ariz., has been looking forward to the establishment this week of a Web site where American museums are posting their collection of paintings, sculptures and other works of art that might have been looted by the Nazis. "It's similar to one they have in Germany," Nordwind said. "Now you can look for confiscated art on this one central Web site rather than having to go to each museumís Web site separately."

Kaddish With The Pope

06/06/2006
Staff Writer
Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to Auschwitz last Sunday triggered mixed reaction from the Jewish community — praise for adding the stop to his schedule and criticism for failing to even mention the anti-Semitism that laid the foundation for the mass killing of Jews there, hatred that continues throughout Europe today.

Claims Conference To Fund Education

07/25/2003
Staff Writer
Despite complaints from survivors and others that money from the sale of heirless Jewish property in Germany should be used exclusively for the care of needy, aging survivors, the board of the organization that controls those funds voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to continue allocating 20 percent for educational purposes. But opponents of the move vowed to continue to press their case and convince the Claims Conference to reconsider its decision.

Survivors' Input Sought In Swiss Settlement

06/11/1999
Staff Writer
One man spent two years as a slave laborer in Nazi Germany, working for a company whose profits were deposited in a Swiss bank. A woman died of starvation in another factory but her son, who now lives in New York, does not know if Swiss banks profited from her work. The Nazis seized another man's home, but he managed to escape to the United States with just the shirt on his back. He does not know if any of his assets found their way to a Swiss bank.

'A Heroine' For Holocaust Heirs

04/23/1999
Staff Writer
Estelle Sapir was remembered this week as a survivor who came to symbolize the plight of European Jews denied access to Swiss bank accounts opened by relatives murdered in the Holocaust. "She served as the rallying cry for justice," said former New York Sen. Alfonse D'Amato, who spoke at Sapir's funeral last week. "She epitomized the lengths to which institutions went to deny the claims of the heirs of the victims of the Holocaust." Sapir was 73 when she died at her modest, second-floor walkup apartment in Far Rockaway, Queens.
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