Holocaust

Jews To Catholic Church: Delay Sainthood For Pius XII

01/14/2005
Staff Writer
In 1941, when Abraham Foxman was a year old, his parents and a nursemaid carried him east from his Polish homeland to Vilna in an effort to outrun the Nazis. But they failed, and the Nazis ordered his parents and the other Jews of Vilna into a ghetto.

Report Confirms Swiss-Nazi Collusion

03/29/2002
Staff Writer
In an often hard-hitting report, a Swiss government study has documented much of what the Swiss have denied until recent years — that Switzerland turned its back on Jews seeking refuge from the Nazis, often violated its strict neutrality laws by cooperating with the Nazis, and failed to return property to Jews or their heirs.

Survivors Seek More Time To Search German Archives

01/12/2007
Staff Writer
The planned opening of the International Red Cross archive in Germany to Holocaust survivors and their families has prompted them to request that an Italian insurance giant lift a Jan. 15 settlement deadline. On that date the survivors may either accept their insurance settlement for Holocaust-era claims against Assicurazioni Generali or opt out of the offer. The archive contains more than 50 million Nazi files and is scheduled to be open to families and researchers after a formal ratification process by the 11 nations that control it.

Uncanny Tales Of Survival

02/25/2009
Associate Editor
A young chasid, Yosef Yitzhak, a future rebbe, went walking with his father in the summer of 1896, past wheat fields, into a forest, near the village of Lubavitch. His father explained how God formed the breeze that bent the wheat, that fluttered the grass; every movement imagined and set in motion at Creation. There is no such thing as coincidence, not even a breeze. Everything is choreographed from the beginning and into the infinite. And yet, say the mystics, we are dancers within the choreography. The question is whether we can hear the music;

‘Names, Not Numbers’ Keeps Holocaust Memories Alive

05/30/2008
Editor and Publisher
The aging World War II veteran paused at the end of an hour-long interview and addressed the two teenage girls across the table who had been asking him questions. “You have to promise me something,” Sander Dulitz said to them, after describing his three years of combat in the European theater, including landing at Normandy and visiting the Buchenwald concentration camp shortly after it was liberated in the spring of 1945. “Promise me you won’t forget this,” he said, “that you’ll pass it on.”

Graduations With A Shoah Theme

06/23/2000
Staff Writer
"My mother was killed in Auschwitz. If David Irving had won, my mother would have been a victim a second time! So too would everybody else who perished there." "Congratulations on achieving not only the ruling in your favor, but also the justice for survivors."

Polish Gov’t: Auschwitz Crosses To Be Removed

In a unexpected development, the bitter confrontation between Jewish groups and the Polish government over Christian symbols at the Auschwitz death camp moved a few steps closer to resolution this week with a letter from Prime Minister Jerzy Buzek outlini

12/04/1998
Washington Correspondent
Washington — In a unexpected development, the bitter confrontation between Jewish groups and the Polish government over Christian symbols at the Auschwitz death camp moved a few steps closer to resolution this week with a letter from Prime Minister Jerzy Buzek outlining the steps his government is prepared to take to end the conflict. In the letter, Buzek pledged that his government will “remove all new crosses” as soon as possible.

Shoah Funding Split To Get Fresh Scrutiny

03/07/2003
Staff Writer
Faced with a growing chorus of criticism from across the Jewish community and heart-wrenching news stories of survivors unable to pay medical bills, the organization that handles the allocation of Holocaust restitution funds is to re-examine its disbursement policy at its July board meeting here.

Return To Hell

10/10/2003
Staff Writer
Even 60 years later, Philip Bialowitz of Queens is haunted by the Nazi killing factory at Sobibor, Poland. "I still have sleepless nights," Bialowitz, 74, confides. "I still see the killings. You could see the smoke miles away. They killed my two sisters and a niece at Sobibor. My niece was 8 years old and knew she was going to die." He says that when he first arrived at Sobibor, someone asked if he came with his family.

Netting A Notorious Collection

09/12/2003
Staff Writer
Thekla Stein Nordwind of Scottsdale, Ariz., has been looking forward to the establishment this week of a Web site where American museums are posting their collection of paintings, sculptures and other works of art that might have been looted by the Nazis. "It's similar to one they have in Germany," Nordwind said. "Now you can look for confiscated art on this one central Web site rather than having to go to each museumís Web site separately."
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