holidays

Route 17: Season Of Yizkor

The portal opens as quick as a dream.

09/25/2012
Associate Editor

This is the season of memory, of Yizkor. The memorial prayer for loved ones is recited four times in a year, two of them in these days between Yom Kippur and Shemini Atzeret.

Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach: Yizkor’s brevity reflects the brief connection between This World and the Next.

On-Demand Judaism: Observing When It’s Convenient

06/03/2014
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Something new to worry about: It began with the conversation with one of my oldest friends, who is a trustee of the Metropolitan Opera.  She noted that ticket sales were down due to the fact that people do not like to commit to subscriptions, which requires them to be in attendance at a performance at a certain time on a certain evening.  She also noted that her cousin, who is a director of the National Theater in London, had told her that all of the performing arts are in trouble because we live today in an on-demand world.

The Holiday Sprawl

10/02/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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In day school they tell you that the Hebrew month after the jam-packed fall holidays is called Mar-Heshvan; the pre-fix “mar” here means “sad.” We are sad that we have run out of holidays and have a blank month ahead. I feel terrible admitting this, but I feel a bit relieved and, of course — because being Jewish — I feel a bit guilty for feeling relieved.
We all love holidays, but the condensed way that the season barrels into the first weeks of school and work schedules, knocks us over every time. Out-of-office e-mails, the huge outlay of money and the tedium that can accompany meal after meal, service after service, cleanup after cleanup can be daunting. People at the office think Shmini Atzeret must be made up. How many holidays can one religion possibly have in a month?

Erica Brown

Spicing Up Tradition

Indulge in this all-American, kosher "Pi Day" recipe.

03/06/2013
Food & Wine Editor

It’s an annual tradition that on March 14th, which has the same numerals that begin the mathematical constant for π, 3.14, people celebrate “Pi Day” by indulging in the eating of pies and showing off their inner mathematician. Cook Kosher has a fresh take on an American classic with their spicy cayenne apple pie. 

Pie with a punch for Pi Day. Fotolia

Omer Counting in the Digital Age

Can One Sell Chametz Over the Internet?

On the Jewish Techs blog we have looked at the way several Jewish rituals are now performed using the Internet. Not every Jewish ritual can be transferred to the medium of the Internet, but even the question raises some interesting points for discussion.

Selling chametz on the Web has become standard operating procedure. But is it acceptable?

Finding Ways To Celebrate Together

05/31/2011
Editor And Publisher

‘There is nothing new under the sun,” wrote the author of the Bible’s Book of Ecclesiastes who, according to tradition, is King Solomon, the wisest of all men.

Yet much of Jewish life, and particularly American Jewish culture, has been driven by the concept of innovation, or more precisely, balancing ancient tradition with creativity.

Gary Rosenblat

Passover 5771

A Jewish Week Special Section - The Taste of Freedom: Passover 5771

04/05/2011

Passover 5771: Retelling the Story, Haggadah publishing trends, tweeting the seder, keeping the second seder fresh.

 

Passover 5771

Ancient Jewish Computers

In perfecting Judaism’s complex, lunisolar calendar, the Rabbis likely relied on advanced mathematics.

04/05/2011

Passover, the Bible tells us (Exodus 34:18), is Hag Hamatzot (Holiday of The Matzot) whose time is Mo’ed HaAviv, a spring festival, that begins on the 15th day of Nisan, on the night of a full moon after the vernal equinox (“Tekufat HaShana”), following the Passover sacrifice on the 14th.

It’s an unusually precise specification. To ensure that Passover did not start before spring, the tradition in ancient Israel held that the first day of Nisan would not start until the barley is ripe, that being the test for the onset of spring.

DAVID FRIEDMAN, Numbers, 2011, 	acrylic and ink on paper 11”x 14.”

To Every Food There Is A Season

Jewish eating connects us, literally, to our roots in the land.

04/05/2011

It was on a trip to the Sinai many years ago around the time of Shavuot that my eyes were opened to the fascinating cycles of the year. Kids and lambs were everywhere, nursing from their mothers. Bedouins were busy making cheese from the leftover milk, which they later dried and salted to save for the long winter when little milk would be available. Little tufts of green herbs — what we would call weeds — peeked out through the earth, to be consumed by the animals and people in the area. In the desert where so little grows, life is so deeply appreciated when it finally appears.

Israel, c. 1955. Courtesy of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee .
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